Truckers Have a Friend in Oklahoma

By H. Randall Goldsmith | THE JOURNAL RECORD, July 24, 2000 | Go to article overview

Truckers Have a Friend in Oklahoma


H. Randall Goldsmith, THE JOURNAL RECORD


This may fall under the category of "You're not going to believe this!" -- but it is true.

A major advanced technology company is operating right now in Oklahoma City because the State of Oklahoma has adopted policies favorable to the trucking industry. You read that right. A company is here because the trucking laws in the state of Louisiana were egregious when compared to those in Oklahoma.

It flies in the face of conventional wisdom that Oklahoma could be more friendly to business than is Texas or Kansas or just about anywhere else, but it seems our state leaders' efforts to establish Oklahoma as a trucking hub is "paying off."

Enter ProCert Inc. one of the nation's largest transportation industry consulting firms and its youthful President and CEO Chris D. Gorman. Currently operating with 20 employees, ProCert is on track to grow by up to 50 more employees by 2004, a year when the trucking industry is projected to reach $50 billion per year in receipts.

Concentrating on customer service, ProCert on a daily basis and online, provides its customers with operating credentials, including IRP tags, IFTA fuel permits and single-state registration certificates. It also provides its customers with money-saving advice, fuel tax reporting, Federal Heavy Vehicle Use Tax filing and audit support.

With ProCert's team of professionals, the independent truck operator or the fleet owner, has a representative to deal with government regulation at all levels, leaving their customers to concentrate on what they do best -- keeping those 18-wheelers rolling.

A young father of two whose formal education includes music and computer information systems leads the company. He currently is working toward an MBA under an exclusive program at Harvard. Chris Gorman knows the trucking industry and is positioned to take his family's business to new heights in this burgeoning age of business- to-business connectivity. And, he is a client of the Oklahoma Technology Commercialization Center.

Gorman's connection with the Tech Center began with a suggestion from a representative of a CPA firm.

Although his business is serving 3,000 clients and has a history of success, his goal to take it to the next level creates a need for access to investment capital, an activity that is the tech center's strong suit.

There is a mistaken assumption the tech center serves only start- up advanced technology firms. Such companies are a major emphasis for the center but existing technology firms poised to grow with all the uncertainties that entails, are prime candidates for tech center services. Such services include valuation, validating business plans, scrutinizing marketing plans and a host of others often leading to placement of the business owner in front of the Oklahoma Capital Network.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Truckers Have a Friend in Oklahoma
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.