Former Judge Learns about Oklahoma History While Visiting State Parks

THE JOURNAL RECORD, October 12, 2000 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Former Judge Learns about Oklahoma History While Visiting State Parks


DUNCAN (AP) -- Former District Judge Hegel Branch Jr. has spent the night at every state park in Oklahoma except for one -- and since it's unlikely that he will be arrested there, he no longer feels the anticipation about staying there that he once did.

"There are 55 state parks, and I've been to 54," he said.

"In the past year I've learned more Oklahoma history than I did in high school," he said.

"Oklahoma has more diverse territory than I've ever seen."

From pine-covered mountain to endless prairie, canyon to cave and lake to desert, he has seen Oklahoma's extremes -- and all because the state started charging $20 a year for the State Park CEO card last year.

With the card, he said, "I get $2 off a night" for each night he camps in his recreational vehicle at a state park.

That means, with 10 stays, the card is paid for.

Branch decided to get his full money's worth, and "camp at every state park in the state," he said.

There was one state park -- the one he saved for last -- where this former judge anticipated running afoul of the law. It was an interesting concept for a man who has made a career of working within the legal system.

"They do not allow camping," he said. "Do you know what state park it is? It's the Oklahoma Capitol."

It was the forbidden fruit, a tantalizing temptation that helped keep Branch on the road to the farther reaches of the state, and the isolated state parks that he might otherwise have felt like passing over.

While on the road, whether to Black Mesa, Beaver, Alabaster Caverns, Great Salt Plains Lake or Little Sahara, or while resting between trips, he came up with a plan.

"Sitting in the center of the Capitol complex is the Bar Center," he said. Right in the middle of all of that state-owned, no- overnight-camping complex, is a building bought and paid for by the state's attorneys, through contributions and pledges, he said.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Former Judge Learns about Oklahoma History While Visiting State Parks
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?