Union Leaders Faced with New Political Challenges

By Strope, Leigh | THE JOURNAL RECORD, February 14, 2001 | Go to article overview

Union Leaders Faced with New Political Challenges


Strope, Leigh, THE JOURNAL RECORD


LOS ANGELES -- The nation's labor leaders, seeing early signs that the new man in the White House will be less friendly than his predecessor, say they'll fight any attempt by the Bush administration to erode the role of unions in America's workplace.

"We're aware that there's nothing in President Bush's background to suggest that he's much of a supporter of workers' rights to join unions," Mark Splain, AFL-CIO organizing director, said at the group's winter meeting. "We're not going to stand by and allow any further deterioration of those rights."

Bush already has signaled that unions don't have the same place at the table that they did in the Clinton administration. Bush is considering a rollback in Clinton administration rules aimed at barring from government contracts those who have broken environmental, labor, tax and other laws.

Bush also is considering an executive order to ban labor agreements on any project that receives federal money. In addition, he could disband labor-management partnership councils created by Clinton.

"The early warning we got was their decision to float these executive orders," said Bill Samuel, AFL-CIO legislative director. "That's not a good sign. That's not a good way to begin an administration when you're supposed to be reaching out."

New Labor Secretary Elaine Chao is scheduled to address the AFL- CIO's executive council today, the first time many labor leaders directly hear about the administration's plans.

Unions are a cornerstone of the Democratic base, and their members overwhelmingly backed Al Gore over Bush in last year's election.

A record 26 percent of voters who turned out were from union households, and 2 million new voters were registered in the election cycle -- the result, union leaders say, of unprecedented organizing.

But Gore's loss hasn't been organized labor's only setback. Last month, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported the percentage of American workers belonging to unions fell last year to 13.5 percent - - the lowest in six decades. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Union Leaders Faced with New Political Challenges
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.