OKC Foundation Gives $173,000 to 23 Agencies

THE JOURNAL RECORD, December 17, 2001 | Go to article overview

OKC Foundation Gives $173,000 to 23 Agencies


The trustees of the Oklahoma City Community Foundation have approved grants totaling more than $173,000 for 23 nonprofit agencies.

The next deadline for receiving grant application from nonprofit organizations is Jan. 15. Additional information on the grants program, such as guidelines and application forms, are available at www.occf.org under the section entitled Community Programs and Grants.

Groups receiving grants and the amounts include The Boy Scouts of America, $3,000; Metropolitan Library System, $25,000; City of Bethany, $14,500; McCall's Chapel School, $3,700; Harn Gardens, $5,000; Contact Crisis Helpline, $2,200; Edmond Historical Society, $2,250; Reaching Our City, $4,000; South Lee United Methodist Church, $1,500; Evangelistic Baptist Church of Christ, $3,000; Feed the Children, $2,200; Camp Fire USA, $4,358; Institute for Child Advocacy, $5,000; Putnam Heights Historic Preservation Area, $6,000; Mount Saint Mary High School, $9,600; Putnam City Central Middle School, $3,471; Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma, $1,000; Volunteer Center of Central Oklahoma, $5,000; Oklahoma City Art Museum, $25,000; Community Counseling Center, $35,000; and Catholic Charities, $15,000.

Cathy Keating ends campaign

Oklahoma first lady Cathy Keating has dropped her campaign to succeed U.S. Rep. Steve Largent, saying she wants to avoid a difficult runoff election that could be harmful to the Republican party.

"A divisive and bitter runoff election will do nothing to ensure the election of a Republican and that is not who I am as a person nor as a candidate," she said in a written statement. "This is the holiday season. It is a time for giving and it is a time for family and friends."

Keating won 30 percent of the vote in a special GOP primary for the First Congressional District Tuesday, 16 percentage points behind the top finisher, State Rep. John Sullivan. A runoff election had been scheduled for Jan. 8 because neither candidate got a clear majority.

Attorney Doug Dodd, a former Tulsa school board member and broadcaster, easily won the Democratic Primary.

Since no runoff is now needed, the general election to name a successor to Largent, a former professional football player, will now be held on Jan. 8. Largent, R-Okla., plans to step down on Feb.15 to run for governor. Gov. Frank Keating is in his second and final term.

Cargo shipments rise

Cargo shipped through the Tulsa Port of Catoosa increased in November according to Jerry Goodwin, chairman of the City of Tulsa- Rogers County Port Authority.

A total of 190,000 tons in 110 barges passed through the port in November, up from 177,000 tons in 103 barges in October and 159,000 tons in 95 barges in November 2000.

"The increase in the Port's overall tonnage in November was the result of a sharp increase in outbound shipments of wheat and liquid fertilizer," said Goodwin. "Shipments of inbound dry fertilizer declined while other commodities, both inbound and outbound, remained close to October's levels."

November's outbound shipments came to 109,000 tons in 53 barges compared with 73,000 tons in 34 barges in October and 96,000 tons in 49 barges in November 2000. …

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OKC Foundation Gives $173,000 to 23 Agencies
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