Okla. Gov. Henry Names Roth to Corporation Commission

By Francis-Smith, Janice | THE JOURNAL RECORD, May 15, 2007 | Go to article overview

Okla. Gov. Henry Names Roth to Corporation Commission


Francis-Smith, Janice, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Gov. Brad Henry has appointed Oklahoma County Commissioner Jim Roth to replace Denise Bode on the Oklahoma Corporation Commission. Bode is resigning from her post on the commission, which regulates utilities, telecommunications and oil and gas drilling in Oklahoma.

Roth's appointment will make him the first and only openly homosexual person to hold a statewide office in Oklahoma when he assumes his new role June 1.

"Jim Roth has the intellect, the integrity and the dedication to public service needed to be an outstanding corporation commissioner," said Henry. "Not only does he exemplify the highest ethical standards, but he is a consensus-builder who recognizes the importance of bipartisanship and working together. I am confident that Jim's fair-mindedness, honesty and attention to detail will make him an excellent addition to the commission."

Roth said he accepted the appointment after learning Gov. Henry's vision for the position.

"To take advantage of Oklahoma's unique natural resources, its energy and its agriculture, and to reposition it for the sake of America's energy independence for the sake of all of our Oklahoma neighbors," said Roth. "To start looking at the things (the University of Oklahoma and Oklahoma State University) and great Oklahoma assets like the Noble Foundation are looking at biomass and biofuel - and issues of sustainability we need to be talking about as a country and as a state."

Roth, an attorney trained at Oklahoma City University School of Law, also has a political science degree from Kansas State University. He is also a National Security Forum graduate of the United States War College and attended the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard. After practicing law in a private practice in Oklahoma City, Roth joined the staff at Oklahoma County in 1995, serving as chief deputy under the county clerk and chief deputy county commissioner for District 1 before he was elected to the office of county commissioner.

Roth considers his unfamiliarity with many of the energy and regulatory issues governed by the Corporation Commission as an asset, not a liability.

"I approach the issues without bias, without predetermination, ready to learn and make fair decisions," said Roth. "I'm a ratepayer. I too have electricity, I too have cell phones, so I also have that consumer perspective."

His background in law will also assist him in the quasi-judicial role of commissioner, he said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Okla. Gov. Henry Names Roth to Corporation Commission
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.