'What Qualification Do I Need to Be a Reflexologist? and How Do I Start Teaching in Museums?' ; THE CAREERS ADVISER

By Haydon, Caroline | The Independent (London, England), June 7, 2007 | Go to article overview
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'What Qualification Do I Need to Be a Reflexologist? and How Do I Start Teaching in Museums?' ; THE CAREERS ADVISER


Haydon, Caroline, The Independent (London, England)


A start in reflexology

I would like to train in a complementary therapy such as reflexology, but I don't know at what age you can start, or what sort of qualification you might take.

Reflexology isn't a regulated profession and you could theoretically take any course and set up your own practice afterwards. However, it is a good idea to take an accredited course. The Association of Reflexologists (AOR) is one of the largest professional organ-isations for those working in the business and has rules for the courses it accredits - students must, for example, be 19, and courses must provide at least 100 hours contact teaching time, including lectures, tutorials, and supervised reflexology practice. The association sets out a required curriculum which must be covered, and requires a minimum of six case studies from each student and evidence of at least 60 treatments. Accredited courses are listed on www.aor.org.uk. If you take a look you will see there are many ways of studying - weekend study, or evening and weekend courses are quite common. Colleges also offer reflexology as an option as a part of wider studies in complementary approaches to health, which you might want to check out. Building up a practice does take time and you will probably have to work part time - and flexibly - when starting out. If you are a student on an accredited course you can join a local AOR area group to meet and network with others for a small fee.

Teaching in museums

I have been teaching English in a primary school for a while now but don't find the work rewarding any more. Looking around for work in which I might use my previous enthusiasm for teaching I wonder if educational work in museums would be a possible avenue - but is it difficult to cross over into this type of work?

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