Lord of the Wings: Culture and the Crow ; EXTRA

By Caesar, Ed | The Independent (London, England), August 6, 2007 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Lord of the Wings: Culture and the Crow ; EXTRA


Caesar, Ed, The Independent (London, England)


CROWS IN MYTH

In mythology, crows find themselves confused, and interchangeable, with ravens. Whatever one calls the corvids, they have played a potent role in the popular imaginations of cultures all over the world. They are demi-Gods, harbingers of doom, safe- keepers and messengers.

The ancient Greeks accounted for the crow's black feathers with a tale of infidelity. Ischys, the son of Elatus and Hippea, had fallen in love with Coronis, who was carrying Apollo's child. When a passing crow - who was then, like all crows, white-feathered - told Apollo of Coronis' infidelity, he was so angered that he turned the crow's feathers black, before killing Ischys.

In Norse mythology the god Odin keeps two ravens, Huginn and Muninn, who represent Thought and Memory. Odin sends his ravens around the world at daybreak, to bring him news. In Irish and Welsh myth, the Raven plays the role of prophet, and in the shamanistic cultures of the North-west American Indians, the raven helps to create the world.

CROWS IN CULTURE

Perhaps the most famous literary corvid is Edgar Allen Poe's "The Raven" - a work first published in the New York Evening Mirror in 1845. The narrative poem is a gothic tale of a distraught young woman visited by a talking raven in the night, and gives an account of her descent into madness.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Lord of the Wings: Culture and the Crow ; EXTRA
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?