Prejudice, Politics, and the Fight for Equality

The Independent (London, England), September 2, 2007 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Prejudice, Politics, and the Fight for Equality


Leading Article

RACE RELATIONS

Thirty one years after it was established by the Race Relations Act, the Commission for Racial Equality has issued its final report. The CRE will be subsumed at the end of the month into an overarching "Equality Commission". So have the CRE's founding objectives of eradicating racial prejudice and discrimination from British life been achieved? Far from it.

Of course there have been improvements over the past three decades. Outright racial discrimination is no longer acceptable. As the report notes, the days when boarding houses could put out signs saying "No blacks, no Irish, no dogs" are over. The National Front is no longer a force in British politics. The Scarman and Macpherson reports have led to a general improvement in the behaviour of the police with respect to ethnic minorities.

But things have been slipping back on the criminal justice front. The number of young men from ethnic minorities being stopped and searched has rocketed in recent years, as the police make full use of their sweeping anti-terrorism powers. The National DNA Database is another screaming example of how the criminal justice system remains biased against ethnic minorities. The database contains the DNA of nearly 40 per cent of black men and 13 per cent of Asian men, many of whom have not been charged, let alone found guilty of a crime.

Education is another area where prejudice persists. Black boys are far more likely to be excluded from school, despite the fact that their behaviour is often no more disruptive than that of their white counterparts. And so the list of inequalities goes on. Ethnic minority groups are less likely to have access to decent health treatment. They are more likely to live in substandard social housing. The ethnic minority faces in positions of power in the worlds of business, the law and the media are disproportionately few.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Prejudice, Politics, and the Fight for Equality
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?