Michigan, Minnesota Covet Little Brown Jug

By Sam Ross, Jr. | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, October 25, 2007 | Go to article overview

Michigan, Minnesota Covet Little Brown Jug


Sam Ross, Jr., Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Minnesota is 1-7, coming off a humbling 27-21 loss to Division I- AA North Dakota State, and sure to be home for the holidays.

But there is excitement in advance of a Saturday game at Michigan, where the Gophers and Wolverines will play for the Little Brown Jug, which Michigan trumpets as college football's oldest trophy game. More on that later.

Although Michigan has won the prize 34 of the past 37 seasons, Minnesota won the game, and the Jug, in 2005 in Ann Arbor.

"I was actually the first one to touch the jug," said safety Dom Barber. "Being able to do that was a dream come true."

In a miserable season, the Jug provides motivation, as do other trophy/rivalry games throughout the country.

"We're not going to a bowl game," Barber said. "But we've got three trophy games left."

Michigan takes this jug thing seriously. The history has to do with legendary coach Fielding Yost playing at Minnesota in 1903 with both teams unbeaten. Not trusting the home folks to supply good water, Yost dispatched a manager to buy a container. He returned with the clay jug, supposedly at a cost of 30 cents.

When Minnesota scored late to tie the game, 6-6, fans stormed the field and the game was not completed. Michigan hopped a train to Chicago, forgetting the jug.

When Yost wrote a letter asking for it to be returned, Minnesota challenged him to play for it. That didn't happen until 1909, when Michigan did win the jug back. Each season, before the game, the history is retold to the Michigan team.

This week, someone asked coach Lloyd Carr if he feared a player dropping the Jug during the celebrations, and destroying history in the process.

"That's somebody else's problem," Carr said.

Hockey players might drink from the Stanley Cup after winning it, but Carr said of drinking from the jug: "I don't think I would want to do that."

But Carr respects the history.

"It has a great tradition, a great meaning here," he said. "When you lose it, it's a miserable experience. When you win it, you get to keep that jug where it belongs, I mean, we bought that jug."

According to the NCAA record book, the most-played rivalry is Minnesota-Wisconsin, which has been contested 116 times beginning in 1891, with Minnesota on top, 59-49-8.

This game had been played for the "Slab of Bacon," a piece of a wood with the letter "W" or "M" on it, depending on the viewer's perspective, but that trophy was lost. The prize since 1948 has been Paul Bunyan's Axe.

Assorted Rivalries

Name

Teams

First

year

The Big Game

Califorinia/Stanford

1892

Crosstown Rivalry

USC/UCLA

1929

Duel in the Desert

Arizona/Arizona

State

1899

Iron Bowl

Alabama/Auburn

1893

Keg of Nails

Cincinnati/Louisville

1929

Clean Old-Fashioned Hate

Georgia/Georgia

Tech

1893

Backyard Brawl

Pitt/West

Virginia

1895

Apple Cup

Washington/Washington

St.

1900

Old Oaken Bucket

Indiana/Purdue

1925

THIS ISN'T KANSAS, TOTO

Kansas left the borders of its state for the first time this season last weekend, knocking off Colorado, 19-14, in Boulder.

The Jayhawks, who had played five home games and at Kansas State previously, are 7-0 and ranked No. 12, but there are skeptics.

"I'm not going to say whether we're for real or not,'' Kansas coach Mark Mangino said. "If you watch the games, you will see if we're for real. This 2007 team is a new ball club. (It) has a different mentality than it did a year ago. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Michigan, Minnesota Covet Little Brown Jug
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.