The Past and Future of Medieval Studies

By Olsen, Glenn W. | The Catholic Historical Review, July 1996 | Go to article overview

The Past and Future of Medieval Studies


Olsen, Glenn W., The Catholic Historical Review


Medieval

The Past and Future of Medieval Studies. Edited by John Van Engen. [Notre Dame Conferences in Medieval Studies, Number IV ] (Notre Dame, Indiana: University of Notre Dame Press. 1994. Pp. xi, 431. $52.95.)

This book is the result of a 1992 conference during which a group of scholars from across North America were asked to reflect on the past and future of medieval studies. The late Michael Sheehan provides introductory remarks. Kathleen Biddick gives a dense presentation of which one must frequently guess meanings: her proposal is that the medievalist act as a cultural construct go-between. Patrick J. Geary asks what makes North American medieval scholarship different from that of Europe and offers suggestive answers. In giving an apologia for Byzantium as a field of medieval studies, Michael McCormick supplements Geary by noting how traditional nationalist and micro-regional research on Europe by Europeans has increasingly been complemented by macro-regional and comparative research. Jeremy Cohen gives an intelligent overview of the study of high medieval Judaism, showing how this has been linked to the goals and worries of Jewish emancipation. Particularly Biddick's contribution had already made useful observations about orientalism, which, in connection with the development of medieval Islamic studies, is the subject of a lucid exposition by Richard W Bulliet.

Sabine MacCormack's argument, using the history of the reception of Virgil's Aeneid into the seventeenth century as example in an essay of broad vision, is that by study of how tradition changes in transmission, the medievalist is well placed to address many current cultural issues. Randolph Starn very intelligently explores the bond between medieval and Renaissance studies, proposing that a genealogical history composed of simultaneous narratives replace "the old conventions of periodization." In an elegant, amusing, essay, Mark D. Jordan turns his attention to the institutional motives behind the study of medieval philosophy, exposing the often unhistorical, unreflective, view many philosophy departments have of their motives for study of the history of philosophy. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Past and Future of Medieval Studies
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.