History, Prophecy, and the Stars: The Christian Astrology of Pierre d'Ailly, 1350-1420

By Oakley, Francis | The Catholic Historical Review, July 1996 | Go to article overview

History, Prophecy, and the Stars: The Christian Astrology of Pierre d'Ailly, 1350-1420


Oakley, Francis, The Catholic Historical Review


History, Prophecy, and the Stars: The Christian Astrology of Pierre d'Ailly, 1350-1420. By Laura Ackerman Smoller. (Princeton: Princeton University Press. 1994. Pp. xii, 233. $35.00.)

With the contributions of such scholars as Ouy, Courtenay, Bernstein, Pascoe, Guenee, Kazmarek, Pluta, and Chappuis, fans of Pierre d'Ailly appear of late to be growing in number, and they have good reason to welcome this cogent, intriguing, and well-researched book, which packs a good deal of learning into surprisingly small compass. A faithful follower of the via moderna at the University of Paris, d'Ailly rose to prominence as one of the most distinguished theologians of his day, as chancellor of the university, reforming churchman, cardinal of the Pisan obedience, and a leading conciliarist spokesman at the Council of Constance, deeply involved in the successful efforts of that assembly to end the schism. Scholars have long known that he dabbled in astrology as well as wrote on astronomical, calendric, and geographical questions, but despite his arresting choice of the year 1789 for the future arrival of Antichrist, no previous scholar has accorded this aspect of his life and work the degree of painstaking attention extended to it by Smoller.

In so doing, she constructs a persuasive portrait of a thinker who in his earlier years had shared both the widespread apocalyptic foreboding generated by the protracted schism and the antipathy toward the claims made for astrological divination long common among churchmen, but who in the last ten years of his life, as his hopes for a genuine reform of the Church waxed and his apocalypticism waned, turned to astrology as an analytical tool to help him confirm his sense that the coming of Antichrist was not imminent. For by that time, and unlike such contemporaries as Nicole d'Oresme and Heinrich von Langenstein, he had come to view astrology as a rational science that would enable him to make sense of history and prophecy. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

History, Prophecy, and the Stars: The Christian Astrology of Pierre d'Ailly, 1350-1420
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.