Folk and Fairy Tales: A Handbook

By Pears, Chris | Multicultural Education, Spring 2006 | Go to article overview

Folk and Fairy Tales: A Handbook


Pears, Chris, Multicultural Education


Folk and Fairy Tales: A Handbook. Ashliman, D. L. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2004 268 pages, ISBN 0-313-32810-2

D. L. Ashliman's Handbook is a well-ordered analysis of the folk and fairy tale genre. Its strengths lie in the effective categorization and definition of the various types of stories, the extensive glossary, and the cogent explanation of the impact of these tales upon literature and the arts. Its shortcomings rest in the decision to limit its examination of these tales to only those from the Indo-European tradition and its superficial analysis of the sociological impacts these tales have had upon society today.

Folk and fairy tales encompass a wide variety of types of stories. The author succinctly explains these different classifications within the genre, using the Aarne-Thompson Index1 as a framework. By making extensive use of examples, Ashliman shows clearly the contrasts between, and differing themes amongst, the broad range of tales.

The definitions section is particularly valuable to the reader seeking to get a clearer understanding of the various components of the genre and the contrasts between them. A wide-ranging bibliography, organizes content by both region and theme. The glossary is both detailed and extensive. As an introductory resource for further study, the book is exemplary.

Folk and fairy tales continue to have a pervasive impact upon our world today: the literary and cinematic successes of J. R. R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings trilogy and J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter novels, are rooted in their fairy tale origins. Ashliman, when placing these tales within a literary context, reveals the dominant impact that folk tales have had, and continue to have, upon literature, music and film.

However, the treatment of issues of gender within these tales is superficial. Nor, in the analysis of sociological effects, is any detailed focus given to their impact upon the development of capitalist culture. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Folk and Fairy Tales: A Handbook
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.