U.S. Arms Sales Continue Decline, Russia Top Exporter in 1995

By Walkling, Sarah | Arms Control Today, August 1996 | Go to article overview

U.S. Arms Sales Continue Decline, Russia Top Exporter in 1995


Walkling, Sarah, Arms Control Today


NEW REPORTS released by the Department of Defense and the Congressional Research Service (CRS) show that U.S. conventional arms exports continued to drop below Cold War levels in 1995, and Russia emerged as the leading arms dealer to the developing world.

According to Foreign Military Sales, Foreign Military Construction Sales and Military Assistance Facts released by the Defense Security Assistance Agency on August 1, U.S. foreign military sales agreementsgovernment-to-government conventional arms transfer agreements-dropped to $9 billion during fiscal year (FY) 1995, a 30 percent drop from the FY94 total of $12.9 billion. All regional markets for U.S. weapons continued to decline in value from their post-Gulf War peaks.

Conventional Arms Transfers to Developing Nations, 1988-1995, written by CRS national defense specialist Richard F. Grimmett and released on August 19, reported that in 1995 U.S. conventional arms transfer agreements with developing countries totalled $3.8 billion or approximately a quarter of the weapons market in the developing world. This represents a $2.5 billion drop from the previous year. From 1990 through 1993, with the collapse of the Soviet Union (which previously had dominated the arms market) and the surge in sales of U.S. weaponry following the Gulf War, the United States had led in weapons exports to developing countries. Since 1993, however, U.S. arms exports to developing states have fallen by 76 percent.

For the first time since the end of the Soviet Union, Russia emerged as the largest seller of weapons to developing countries, capturing $6 billion, or 39 percent, of the developing world market in 1995. Russia displaced the 1994 leader, France, which dropped to third place. Russia's total dollar value in arms transfer agreements last year was almost twice its 1994 total. According to Grimmett, sales of Su-27s and Kilo-class attack submarines constituted a large portion of Moscow's arms transfer agreements. Last year Russia agreed to sell China 72 Su-27s at an estimated cost of $2 billion.

According to Grimmett, the shifting in rank between the largest suppliers of conventional weapons may be characteristic of the shrinking post-Cold War arms market as competition for large orders intensifies. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

U.S. Arms Sales Continue Decline, Russia Top Exporter in 1995
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.