Newly Created MIRC to Improve Readiness of Army Reserve Intelligence

By Sands, Michael | Army Reserve Magazine, October 1, 2005 | Go to article overview

Newly Created MIRC to Improve Readiness of Army Reserve Intelligence


Sands, Michael, Army Reserve Magazine


As the Army continues with the Global War on Terrorism, it strives to improve its capabilities by forming new training methods, tactics and organizations. A recently created unit is the Military Intelligence Readiness Command (MIRC), headquartered at Fort Belvoir, Va.

The objective of the MIRC is to improve the readiness of Army Reserve Military Intelligence (MI) Soldiers and units, according to MG George Fay, Department of the Army (DA) deputy security officer G-2. "Ultimately, the MIRC is our opportunity to do just that-to provide increased readiness of the Reserve MI force by providing trained and ready Soldiers and units," Fay said.

As a reserve officer of many years and former deputy commander of the Intelligence and security Command, Fay has witnessed a key challenge to Army Reserve intelligence, specifically, training highly skilled Soldiers so that they are ready when called upon. However, there is limited time to train in a part-time capacity. The MIRC was formed to meet this challenge, but how exactly will the MIRC accomplish its objective?

COL Dorothy Perkins, chief of manpower and reserve affairs, European Command, envisions the MIRC as a command that completely manages the Army Reserve MI force, specifically recruiting, and training Soldiers to do their jobs making units ready to deploy and creating a force structure to allow Soldiers to grow, mature, be promoted and assume higher level responsibilities.

Prior to the MIRC's existence, there was no organization solely responsible for recruiting and training Army Reserve MI Soldiers, nor were there clear career paths for Soldiers to determine subsequent assignments for further professional development. The Soldier was responsible for finding a unit to which he would be assigned and determine on his own where his next assignment would be if his present unit had no vacancies. The MIRC's charge is to provide training and development opportunities for Soldiers in a more deliberate manner.

"The MIRC can further influence the active component's ability to access Army Reserve MI units and skillfully integrate them into the fight. In doing so, the MIRC may foster a greater understanding among supported commands of Army Reserve MI unit composition, availability, capability, and specific methods of obtaining MI Soldiers from the Army Reserve. In addition, there is a huge ability to leverage support through the MIRC's five Army Reserve Intelligence Support Centers throughout the United States," said Perkins.

MIRC units are always "in the fight" and provide ongoing intelligence support to active Army units worldwide. …

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Newly Created MIRC to Improve Readiness of Army Reserve Intelligence
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