Teaching Electronics Via Satellite

By McGahan, Marilyn | Techniques, September 1996 | Go to article overview

Teaching Electronics Via Satellite


McGahan, Marilyn, Techniques


Nebraska was the first state to purchase a dedicated multiplechannel transponder for educational use. This technology makes broadcast possible worldwide. Earlier this year, for example, a preparatory class for the Certified Electronics Technician exam (CET) aired over NEB-SAT (Nebraska Satellite). From the first class in January to the final exam in April, electronics technicians across North America were tuned into Satellite Spacenet 3, Channel 4. For three hours every Wednesday night, interested students could brush up on their skills in order to pass the Associate Certified Electronics Technician examination.

The course originated at MidPlains Community College in North Platte, Nebraska. Ten students participated at the North Platte campus. Other registered students were from Hawaii, Florida, Saskatchewan, Washington, Alabama, New Jersey, New Hampshire, Delaware and Utah. Each site was a classroom with an administrator or teacher to facilitate each session. Facilitators basically operated equipment and administered the final test. Hundreds of people may have watched the course, but not taken it for credit. Thus, it was impossible to determine the total number of participants.

Being able to secure a prime time slot on the satellite was an advantage for the success of the course. Mid-Plains was able to secure a 7:30 p.m. central time slot.

Some distance learning challenges

Mid-Plains electronics instructors Gordon Koch and Dick Stephens agreed to conduct this course in addition to teaching their regular on-campus classes. Although it was their first distance learning class, they approached this challenge with enthusiasm.

One of the first things they learned was the need for supplemental hands-on materials. Instructors were able to develop these materials with graphics software programs. The materials were mailed to the students about a week before each class session. They included study aids and handouts used for problemsolving, following diagrams and taking notes.

Instructors soon relaxed and adjusted to the new classroom situation. They found that they had to keep things moving because this type of satellite class did not allow for the interaction of an on-campus class. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Teaching Electronics Via Satellite
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.