Trade Show Leader Carrie Freeman Helps Create Company Image

Baylor Business Review, Fall 1996 | Go to article overview

Trade Show Leader Carrie Freeman Helps Create Company Image


Basically we create dreams," says Carrie Freeman, president of Freeman Exhibit Company. "We give vision and shape to our clients' marketing needs by producing trade show exhibits and environments that deliver messages, establish relationships, and increase sales.

"It's an exciting business but also a very challenging one. Our account managers start by eliciting information from a client about specific needs or goals for the exhibit. Then our designers create a blueprint for an idea that's never been done before. Next we take it to our carpenters and watch it being built in the shop. At every step, our people become more excited so that by the time the exhibit is completed, we all have a lot of ownership in what we're doing." But it's not just ownership in projects that Freeman generates.

The Impact of Company Culture

Earlier this year, Forbes magazine cited the Dallas-based Freeman Companies as "second in the country" in the convention and trade show industry. In 1995, the firm produced 2,600 trade shows that brought in over $362 million in revenues. What can such success be attributed to? Perhaps it is tied to the principles that this privately held corporation has been built upon.

"My grandfather, Buck Freeman, founded the company on a concept he drew from Ralph Waldo Emerson: `Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm.' Add to that the mindset of the chairman of our parent company (my dad) who believes `you always hire people that are better than you are, train them well, give them the right support, and then let them do their jobs.' The result is a very participative firm. Right now, full-time employees hold over 30% of company stock."

The Freeman Companies and its four individual companies each specialize in a particular services area for meetings, conventions, and trade shows. Each is an independent profit center with its own presidents and general managers. Carrie points out that general managers have a lot of autonomy in running their branches because their home offices trust them implicitly.

"Such an environment gives a lot of people the freedom to be better than they ever thought they could be, and this doesn't apply just to management.

"For example, in our exhibit company, graphic design is really critical. Styles tend to change so quickly and so frequently that design can `date an exhibit faster than chipped paint.' It's amazing to see some of the computergenerated renderings that our designers are coming up with today. This advanced technology is enhancing their inherent talents and enabling them to produce really awesome work."

Freeman's Client Base

Freeman's clients range from individual trade show exhibitors and small businesses to some of the nation's largest corporations and professional associations. Their clients are drawn from such industries as aerospace, manufacturing, travel, oil/gas/chemical, energy, technology, telecommunications, health, travel, food/beverage, financial services, radio/TV/cable, real estate, and publishing.

"We hit a pretty broad spectrum," says Carrie. "We're the official contractor for more than a third of the 200 largest U.S. trade shows, and work with such big events as the Republican National Convention. However, we also serve clients involved in trade shows as small as 5-10 booths and work with groups who, for example, might need a stage and five tables for a fashion show or an individual who needs to rent an overhead projector for several days.

"Our work this summer on the Republican convention was especially challenging. In the RNC's previous conventions in Houston and New Orleans, we worked in domed sports arenas that were already equipped with plenty of built-in seating, VIP boxes, and high ceilings that could handle special lighting requirements and that type of thing. So, for the San Diego Convention Center, we had to come up with a different game plan for the podium, the press boxes, the tons of communications cable, etc. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Trade Show Leader Carrie Freeman Helps Create Company Image
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.