NET Gain

By Carlson, David; Seidman, Peter et al. | Techniques, November/December 1996 | Go to article overview

NET Gain


Carlson, David, Seidman, Peter, Wagner, Judy, Techniques


There are hundreds of K-12 Web sites in the United States geared toward education-often designed and produced by students, teachers or school staff. And because the Web is not managed by one company or organization, these Web sites can pop up overnight virtually unnoticed. This installment of NET Gain begins with ways to find these educational sites and closes with an invitation to help build a valuable electronic resource.

Geographical directories We b66's lnternational Registry ot K-12 Schools located at http://web66.coled.umn.edu/schools.html lists 55 countries with school Web sites. For school Web sites in the United States see http://web66.coled.umn.edu/schools/US/USA.html. Each state listing is subdivided into elementary schools, secondary schools, school districts, educational organizations and resources.

Infoseek at http://www.infoseek.com/ also has geographical listings of schools, but you must follow a few levels of "Related Topics" links to reach a specific site. (For example, "education" to "K-12" to "high schools and secondary schools" to "high schools in North America" to "high schools in the U.S.") If you're looking for a particular school, you can use Infoseek's keyword searching facility to find it.

Yahoo! has an alphabetical listing of U.S. high schools (not subdivided by state) that contains 942 items. You'll find it at http://www.yahoo.com/Regional/Countries/United_States/Education/K-1 2/High_Schools/.

Topical directories and free text searches

A source of frustration for some Techniques readers using geographical listings may be that there is no easy way to find the schools with vocational programs. The vocational schools directory at Yahoo! is http://www.yahoo.com/Education/Vocational Schools/ However, the 125item listing mixes secondary, postsecondary, public and private institutions and may not include vocational components at comprehensive schools. …

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