Secondary Schools Online: Are High School Web Sites Effective?

By Hartshorne, Richard; Friedman, Adam et al. | American Secondary Education, Spring 2006 | Go to article overview

Secondary Schools Online: Are High School Web Sites Effective?


Hartshorne, Richard, Friedman, Adam, Algozzine, Bob, Isibor, Theresa, American Secondary Education


ABSTRACT

High schools have traditionally focused on the in-depth instruction of specific subject matter and have served as both a preparatory phase for higher education for some students and an institution that prepares others to enter the workforce. One method to help high schools accomplish these goals is through the creation and maintenance of a school Web site. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent to which high schools' Web sites reflect the overarching goals of high schools and how well they meet criteria for effectiveness based on the fusion of literature on high schools and effective Web site design and development.

A steady increase in Internet connectivity among the various stakeholders in the educational process is the primary reason for the rise in popularity of school Web sites (Chen, 2002; National Center for Education Statistics, 2003; U.S. Department of Commerce, 2001). With this increase in popularity, it becomes increasingly important that the goals of school sites align with and supplement the goals of the educational institutions they represent. There are two primary goals of school Web sites. First, as information systems for site visitors, they provide access to an array of data and information. second, school Web sites act as intermediaries between the various stakeholders in the educational process, such as the school, parents, and the community (McKenzie, 1997). There are also a number of secondary goals which possess significance for high schools, including: 1) introducing educational stakeholders to the school, 2) providing opportunities for local and global publication of student work, 3) acting as an intermediary to a larger body of information, and 4) providing a rich source of locally relevant data related to a variety of instructional topics (McKenzie, 1997).

GOALS FOR WEB SITES

INTRODUCING THE SCHOOL

A Web site can serve as an effective introduction to the high school. This includes conveying information, such as the overall character, look, mission, and environment of the school. These "introductions" should include an assortment of information, such as a picture of the school, demographic information of the student body, school accountability information, faculty/staff information, course offerings, and resource information. Current and potential students, parents, and other stakeholders in the educational process would find this information useful.

PUBLISHING STUDENT WORK

Another important purpose of high school Web sites is to provide opportunities for students to publish their work both locally and globally. Not only does this further introduce site visitors to the school, but it also has a number of implications for student learning. Numerous studies have demonstrated the value of publishing student work on the World Wide Web. For instance, Dixon and Black (1996) and Routman (1991) found that publication of student work could be motivational for many students. Riley and Roberts (2000), as well as Ward-Schofield and Locke-Davidson (2002) reported other results, such as increased student achievement and increased positive attitudes toward content. Other studies have illustrated that student web publication allowed students to visualize the purpose of their work much more clearly and promoted reflection regarding their individual growth and development (Snyder, Lippincott, & Bower, 1998; Spitz, 1996; Willet-Smith, 1993).

INTRODUCING A LARGER BODY OF INFORMATION

High school Web sites can provide diverse resources for students, parents, and teachers, including guidance resources and other information. Student resources might include a variety of curricular tools for all subject areas. Items such as Internet search tools, tutorials, help/homework centers, remediation tools, and additional educational resources could be included. For teachers, the high school Web site could provide access to assorted lesson plans related to the high school curriculum or additional resources for enhancing the teaching and learning environment. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Secondary Schools Online: Are High School Web Sites Effective?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.