The Economics of Terrestrial Invasive Species: A Review of the Literature

By Olson, Lars J. | Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, April 2006 | Go to article overview

The Economics of Terrestrial Invasive Species: A Review of the Literature


Olson, Lars J., Agricultural and Resource Economics Review


This paper reviews the literature on the economics of invasive species management as it applies to invasive species in general and terrestrial invasive species in particular. The paper summarizes a number of recent studies that assign values to the economic impact of terrestrial invasive species on a national scale. This is followed by a review of the economic literature on control and prevention of a biological invasion and the literature on international trade and trade policy with invasive species. The paper then reviews selected studies on terrestrial invasive plants, animals, and microbes, respectively.

Key Words: terrestrial invasive species, prevention, control, international trade, bioeconomic modeling

Throughout history the spread of plants, animals, and other organisms has been governed by natural ecological processes and has accompanied trade in goods and services and the movement of humans. As a consequence, species are continually introduced to areas outside their native geographic location and some of these species establish themselves as harmful invaders. Invasive species are one of the leading causes of global ecological change. Of 256 vertebrate extinctions with an identifiable cause, 109 are known to be due to biological invaders, while 70 are known to be caused by human exploitation (Cox 1993). In the United States, it is estimated that 40 percent of the threatened or endangered species are at risk due to pressures from invasive species (Nature Conservancy 1996, Wilcove et al. 1998). Invasive species also impose significant economic losses to consumer and producer welfare.

The problems associated with invasive species are not new and have long been recognized. U.S. invasive species policy dates to the Lacey Act of 1900. In recent years, however, increased globalization has led scientists and policymakers to focus more attention on the potential costs associated with invasive species introductions. Of the nearly 30 federal U.S. acts pertaining to invasive species, approximately half have been adopted since 1990 (National Agricultural Library 2006).1

As recognition of invasive species problems has grown, so has the economics literature. The purpose of this paper is to review the methodological literature on the economics of invasive species management as it applies to invasive species in general and terrestrial invasive species in particular. The paper is organized as follows. It begins with a summary of a number of recent studies that assign values to the economic impact of terrestrial invasive species on a national scale. This is followed by a review of the economics literature on control and prevention of a biological invasion. The section after that surveys the literature on international trade and trade policy with invasive species. The paper then reviews selected studies on terrestrial invasive plants, animals, and microbes, respectively. The final section contains brief, concluding remarks.

There are important aspects of the literature that are not reviewed here. The focus of this survey is only on terrestrial invasive species. Aquatic invasive species are examined in the companion paper by Lovell, Stone, and Fernandez (2006). In addition, this paper does not attempt an exhaustive survey of the numerous case studies of individual species in specific locations that assign values for control costs or damages or both. Many of these are referenced in the recent studies that value the economic impact of invasive species on a regional or national scale. These studies combine estimates of invasive species impacts from a large number of different sources whose reliability varies tremendously. It is beyond the scope of this paper to evaluate the assumptions that under lie each disaggregate estimate. Instead, it is left to the interested reader to consult the sources cited in the next section.2

A number of issues are closely related to the economics of invasive species. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Economics of Terrestrial Invasive Species: A Review of the Literature
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.