Year End Planning Using a Donor-Advised Fund for Charitable Giving

By Landau, Jerome | The CPA Journal, December 1996 | Go to article overview

Year End Planning Using a Donor-Advised Fund for Charitable Giving


Landau, Jerome, The CPA Journal


It's that time of year again!

December is the month for "numbers crunching," and final year-end tax planning and forecasting-what's my taxable income apt to be for 1996, and what am I looking forward to for 1997; what's my attained tax bracket for 1996, and what will it be in 1997? Shall I attempt to defer receipt of income to 1997, or should I accelerate deductions for 1996. Finally, do I need to a amend my declarations of estimated tax for the last installment due for 1996.

During the month of December, many will see promotions and advertisements by tax-exempt organizations soliciting contributions in cash or in kind. There are myriad kinds of charitable contributions which are deductible under the provisions of IRC section 170 and related sections for the charitably inclined who are also considering their tax liability for 1996. There are, among other charitable vehicles, public charities, private foundations, private operating foundations, supporting foundations, pooled income funds, donor-advised funds, and others.

Gifts to donor-advised funds, unlike those to some of the more esoteric forms of charitable organizations, usually require no legal procedures on behalf of the donor and no IRS applications or annual IRS filings by such donor. The typical donor-advised fund is already in effect and has been determined to be organized and tax exempt pursuant to IRC section 501(c)(3), or other related sections of the Code, in order to benefit charitable, educational, religious, scientific and other similar organizations.

Since the donor-advised fund already has been determined to be a tax-exempt organization, contributions to it are immediately tax deductible within the donor's adjusted gross income (AGI) percentage limits. The modus operandi of the donor-advised fund is that it accepts contributions and written recommendations thereafter from the donor about gifts the fund will make to specific organizations and in specific amounts. Thus, if a taxpayer makes a $10,000 gift on December 20, 1996, to a donor-advised fund, he or she typically is entitled to a $10,000 charitable contribution deduction, within AGI limits, for 1996, and can, in 1997 and thereafter, designate by recommendation to which organization, and in what amounts the funds are to be donated. In order to preserve the tax deduction for the year when paid to the donor-advised fund, the donoradvised fund technically reserves the right to reject the recommendation, but very rarely does. …

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Year End Planning Using a Donor-Advised Fund for Charitable Giving
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