Iran: Post-Revolutionary Politics in Iran: Religion, Society and Power

By Entessar, Nader | The Middle East Journal, Winter 2002 | Go to article overview

Iran: Post-Revolutionary Politics in Iran: Religion, Society and Power


Entessar, Nader, The Middle East Journal


Post-Revolutionary Politics in Iran: Religion, Society and Power, by David Menashri. London, UK and Portland, OR: Frank Cass Publishers, 2001. xii + 324 pages. Appendix to p. 332. Gloss. to p. 336. Bibl. to p. 343. Index to p. 356. $62.50.

The Iranian revolution of 1979 brought about major transformations in Iranian domestic politics and in Iran's foreign policy orientation. The impact of the revolution is still being felt both inside and outside Iran. This book, written by an Israeli scholar and expert on Iran at Tel Aviv University, is a welcome addition to the literature on post-revolutionary Iran. The book is divided into two parts. Part One deals with the domestic scene, while Part Two focuses on the Islamic Republic's foreign policy.

Part One begins with an analysis of the ideological context of the Iranian revolution and its various Islamic manifestations. Menashri discusses at some length the crucial role of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini and the latter's concept of velayat-e faqih (guardianship of the jurisconsult), and the challenges to this theological concept launched by several prominent thinkers, including high-ranking clerics. The author then discusses the power struggle in the Islamic Republic and studies factional alignments in the country. Menashri provides an informative analysis of the role of Khomeini as the arbiter of factional conflicts and the challenges faced by `Ali Hashemi Rafsanjani when the latter assumed the presidency after Khomeini's death in 1989. The system of government that Rafsanjani and his successor, Muhammad Khatami, inherited continues to exhibit the dualistic nature of this power structure. On one hand, there is the office of the rahbar (leader) occupied by Ayatollah `Ali Khamene'i. On the other hand, there is the executive department headed by President Muhammad Khatami and his allies, and to some extent his supporters in the Majlis (parliament).

The sweeping victory of a pro-reform candidate, Khatami, in the 1997 and 2001 presidential elections reflected, inter alia, the desire for change among Iran's youthful population. Although Khatami, to the chagrin of his supporters, has been unable, or unwilling, to transform the country's sociopolitical landscape, he has already succeeded in changing the political culture of the country. Perhaps Khatami's lasting legacy will be his contribution to changing the political discourse in the country. However, this modest contribution may pale when one considers the enormous economic difficulties Iran faces and the unfulfilled promise of greater sociopolitical freedom. Menashri provides an objective and thorough analysis of Iran's domestic woes in the first part of the book.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Iran: Post-Revolutionary Politics in Iran: Religion, Society and Power
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.