Philosophy, Religion, and Science: A History of Christian-Muslim Relations

By Shepard, William | The Middle East Journal, Winter 2002 | Go to article overview

Philosophy, Religion, and Science: A History of Christian-Muslim Relations


Shepard, William, The Middle East Journal


A History of Christian-Muslim Relations, by Hugh Goddard. Chicago, IL: New Amsterdam Books, 2001. xi + 198 pages. Bibl. to p. 200. Index to p. 212. $28.95 cloth; $16.95 paper.

This book presents a reasonably detailed and well written survey of Christian-Muslim relations from the earliest period to the present time. Drawing on the best scholarship in this area, it should be valuable both to readers who are new to the topic and to those who are more familiar with it and wish a convenient overview or an aid to fill in gaps in their knowledge. It complements two earlier works by the author, Christians and Muslims: From Double Standards to Mutual Understanding (Curzon, 1995) and Muslim Perceptions of Christianity (Grey Seal,1996), particularly the former, which provides a comparative history of Christian and Muslim thinking but does not focus on the interactions.

The first of the eight chapters deals with Christian thinking about other religions before the coming of Islam. The second and third chapters discuss early Islam and its attitude toward Christians, Christian reactions to Islam, and Muslim treatment of Christians during the first two centuries of Islam. Chapters four and five cover the Medieval period, including the dialogues and debates that took place between the Muslims and the Byzantines and between Muslims and Christians within the `Abbasid Empire; the conversion of Christians under Muslim rule to Islam; the Western Christian response to Islam including the Crusades; and the transmission of knowledge from the Muslim world to the West. The last three chapters deal with the modern period, particularly Western Christian missions to the Muslim world and some of the Muslim responses, the development of Western academic study of Islam and comparable contemporary Muslim thinking about Christianity, and the efforts at formal dialogue in recent decades. Throughout there are good capsule sketches of key figures, from St. John of Damascus in the eighth century to 20th-century figures such as Louis Massignon.

This is an eminently fair and balanced study. The author consistently seeks to present sympathetically the various ideas and activities under discussion and to help the reader make sense of them in their context. He also consistently stresses the diversity of views and attitudes on both sides. While some medieval Westerners, for example, warred against Muslims in the Crusades, others took a more reasoned approach. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Philosophy, Religion, and Science: A History of Christian-Muslim Relations
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.