CW Network: Back in Black?

By Moore, Natalie Y. | In These Times, April 2006 | Go to article overview

CW Network: Back in Black?


Moore, Natalie Y., In These Times


DIVERSITY IS AN integral part" of the newly formed CW television network, says spokesman Paul McGuire. On May 18, the channel will announce its fall television lineup, and black viewers are looking to see what it includes for them.

Earlier this winter, CBS Corporation and Warner Bros. Entertainment unveiled the CW as their attempt to launch a viable fifth network. The dissolution of UPN and the WB-the revenue-losing fifth and sixth networks-cleared the way for this network, owned jointly by the respective parent companies. CW officials insist they "want to appeal to the various disparate elements" of their target market, the 18 to 34 year old demographic.

But African Americans are not buying the party favors or champagne yet. Once upon a time, a little network called Fox decided to compete with the Big Three-CBS, NBC and ABC. In the mid-'80s, Black-themed and produced shows like "In Living Color," "Living Single," "Roc" and "Martin" inspired a cult-like following among black viewers, who hoped they'd gained a network that consistently valued their tastes and dollars in a non-patronizing way. That symbiotic relationship ran its course by the mid-'90s, when Fox began to cater to a mainstream, white audience with shows like "Ally McBeal," and "Party of Five."

Kristal Brent Zook, author of Color by Fox: The Fox Network and the Revolution in Black Television, says executives initially made a pragmatic business decision to go out on a limb and give unique creative control to blacks. They succeeded by seizing the urban youth market.

Both the WB and UPN formed in 1995 and quickly mimicked the Fox model. Steve Harvey, Jamie Foxx and the younger Wayans Brothers had shows on the WB. UPN is often dubbed "Us Peoples Network," a tongue-in-cheek nod toward its casting choices. But profits and ratings lagged for both networks.

With the growth of cable over the last decade, competition has grown fiercer. For the CW to turn a profit and keep from drifting behind in the ratings, Zook says edgy thinking is necessary.

UPN currently has a lineup that includes several shows with mostly black characters: One on One," "Half and Half," "Eve" and "All of Us. …

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