Scotland, England, and the Reformation, 1534-1561

By Bowman, Glen | Anglican and Episcopal History, June 2006 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Scotland, England, and the Reformation, 1534-1561


Bowman, Glen, Anglican and Episcopal History


CLAIRE KELLAR. Scotland, England, and the Reformation, 1534-1561. Oxford Historical Monographs. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press, 2003. Pp. xi + 257, introduction, bibliography, index. £47.00.

At one time, those interested in early modern history usually studied England, but often not Scotland or Ireland. This has changed. Indeed, it is now axiomatic that the Scots and the Irish be included too. Enter Claire Kellar's Scotland, England, and the Reformation, 1534-1561, a revision of the author's Oxford D. Phil, thesis. Her thesis, as in "main point," is that during these years "English and Scottish experiences of reform were more thoroughly intertwined than traditional accounts might imply," and that "interactions between Scottish and English reformers and laypeople had important mutual influences upon the proceedings of both churches" (3). This "dynamic interplay," she also notes, was profoundly important in "shaping contemporary religious and political thought" (5).

Kellar explains how the political fallout from Henry VIII's break with the church was complicated by Scotland's decision not to follow suit. By willingly taking in rebels, Scotland further angered the king. Despite this, Henry wanted improved diplomatic relations with Scotland's King James V, but James refused to cave in to Henry's demands to arrest refugees who escaped to Scotland for religious reasons. When Cardinal Beaton took over as regent after James' death, the animosity continued, as Scotland established an even more pro-French foreign policy. Those used to studying English foreign policy primarily from the viewpoint of Henry VIII, Cromwell, Somerset, and other mid-Tudor figures, and not from the perspective of Scotland, will find Kellar's approach stimulating.

The later chapters depart from diplomacy and instead emphasize religious and intellectual connections. Kellar notes that although Edward VI's Protestant England and Scotland's Kirk had little in common doctrinally, both countries embraced the reforming and educational qualities of humanism and looked abroad to the continent for support and, indeed, inspiration.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Scotland, England, and the Reformation, 1534-1561
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.