Giving Voice to the "Silent Majority"

By Kostecki, Michel; Simpson, Christopher | International Trade Forum, January 1, 2006 | Go to article overview

Giving Voice to the "Silent Majority"


Kostecki, Michel, Simpson, Christopher, International Trade Forum


Report of "Business for Development" meeting, Hong Kong, China

The challenge to building business advocacy is to develop business-government dialogue, but also to bring in small firms, the informal sector and other parts of society.

Government trade officials, business representatives and researchers at a "Business for Development" forum in December 2005 stressed the need for business to make its views known to government before the latter enacts domestic law on trade or establishes national positions in international trade negotiations. But they highlighted the difficulty of adopting this proactive approach in the developing world, where economic actors are often small and medium-sized firms with low bargaining power, traditional agricultural producers with little access to decision-makers and a large informal sector. Collectively, they form a vast and voiceless "silent majority".

The forum exposed other problems facing business advocacy in developing countries, among them the weakness of business organizations and the dominant position within the WTO system of the business community from developed countries, little concerned with development issues.

Tips to boost advocacy

On the plus side, it also presented a number of case studies from both developed and developing countries, including several highly sophisticated campaigns, highlighting recent progress in trade policy-related advocacy. It also proposed several approaches to creating effective and more proactive business advocacy in developing countries:

* Create guidelines for business organizations in developing countries to help them communicate better with their members and, crucially, with government. In the words of ITC Executive Director, J. Denis Belisle, "Business and government need to get down to basics, make their views known to each other and achieve common goals in trade negotiations." The guidelines would draw from best-practice advocacy approaches from developed and developing countries.

* Encourage North-South business dialogue to identify common interests, viewpoints and goals, build coalitions to advocate policy on issues of mutual concern, and devise joint approaches to managing issues. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Giving Voice to the "Silent Majority"
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.