REPORT: Increased Education May Help Breed Segregation

Diverse Issues in Higher Education, July 13, 2006 | Go to article overview

REPORT: Increased Education May Help Breed Segregation


Studies have long shown that education broadens an individual's perspective and helps to diminish racist attitudes. But a new Rice University study indicates that highly educated Whites help perpetuate racial segregation in U.S. schools.

"I do believe that White people are being sincere when they claim that racial inequality is not a good thing and that they'd like to see it eliminated. However, they are caught in a social system in which their liberal attitudes about race aren't reflected in their behavior," says Dr. Michael Emerson, a Rice University sociologist and co-author of a study titled "School Choice and Racial Segregation in U.S. Schools: The Role of Parents' Education."

Emerson and research colleague Dr. David Sikkink, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Notre Dame, knew that income and other factors come into play in terms of school choice. But even after controlling for these variables, their study shows education has an interesting effect: Whites with more education place a greater emphasis on race when choosing a school for their children, while higher-educated Blacks do not consider race.

In a study to be published in Ethnic and Racial Studies, Emerson and Sikkink cite earlier work on school choice in Philadelphia, where race was found to be a factor in Whites' decisions about the quality of a school. Unlike Blacks, who judged schools on factors like graduation rates and students' test scores, Whites initially eliminated any schools with a majority of Black students before considering factors such as graduation rates.

When they analyzed a national data set of Whites and non-Hispanic Blacks to see if the level of their education would have an impact on their school choice, Emerson and Sikkink found a similar pattern. …

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