Battalion-Level Civil-Military Operations - Danish Style

By Buchholz, Benjamin | Infantry, March/April 2006 | Go to article overview

Battalion-Level Civil-Military Operations - Danish Style


Buchholz, Benjamin, Infantry


In preparation for a joint British and American Civil Affairs operation in Iraq, a diverse team under the aegis of the 9th/12th Lancers researched past assessments of the town done by Danish forces at the beginning of Operation Iraqi Freedom. During this research, the team learned a great deal about Danish techniques for conducting Civil-Military Operations (CMO), techniques which will help battalion-level forces plan and conduct their own operations supporting the transition of governance and security to local Iraqis. The most relevant Danish innovations involve the task organization of their CMO assets and knowledge management in regard to CMO projects.

The Danish Battle Group has approximately 550 soldiers, augmented in Civil Affairs activities by civilians working for the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The unit's mission is to provide operational security for coalition forces, educate Iraqi forces to facilitate a transition to self-sufficient security operations, and to support the reconstruction of Iraqi society. Their concept is to have an overall national strategy to fill the reconstruction gap from the time a regime has collapsed until a new system of governance has been established.

Captain Ferdinand Kjaerulff, one of the Danish officers the British and American team met, said, "the Danish military is not directly interested in state-building but has realized the need to support the transition phase from the conflict to the state-building phase. In the war on terrorism, the military is needed to support the initial phase of the state-building process in order to prevent terrorism and 'failed states' to develop."

To do this, the Danish Battle Group employs three separate but interrelated agencies to conduct CMO - a Civil Military Cooperation (CIMlC) Team responsible for any Civil Affairs actions that impact force protection, a Reconstruction Team (RLJD) responsible for coordinating projects designed to improve the standard of living for Iraqis, and the nonmilitary "Concerted Planning and Action of Civil and Military Activities Initiative" (CPA) run by the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The American and British CMO team met with the CIMIC Team liaison officer Captain A.I. Gjevnøe, CPT Ferdinand Kjaerulff from the Reconstruction Team, and Nicholas Keller from the CPA.

Nicholas Keller had previously served in a military capacity as a CIMIC platoon leader in southern Iraq. He provided the American and British CMO Team with an assessment completed in 2004. In his current capacity Keller works directly for the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and though he has no direct military mandate, be coordinates the disbursement of Danish funds to civil affairs projects throughout the province. In his role, Keller can quickly approve projects up to $100,000 in cost. His intimate knowledge of military and political objectives allows him to advise on the appropriate disbursement of funds for larger, or longer lasting, projects. He updated the 2004 Danish report on Safwan with his personal knowledge of pending and current projects and will continue to liaise with future British and American efforts in the town to ensure they fit within overall plans for the province.

Keller works closely with CPT Kjaerulff's Reconstruction Team, helping to fund their projects. Kjaerulff's Reconstruction Team is one of four such teams composed of Danish military personnel who coordinate directly with local governing bodies to suggest, plan, evaluate, find funding for, execute and maintain civil projects. Currently, for three Iraqi towns in the rural area north and west of Basra, these Reconstruction Teams have more than 500 projects in the execution phase, many more in various stages of planning, or awaiting funding. This is a success story, the exact sort of success story not receiving enough press in America, the small but important milestones in rebuilding and establishing a better Iraq.

Sometimes a project has less impact on the local standard of living, but - instead - a definite military importance. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Battalion-Level Civil-Military Operations - Danish Style
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.