Damage Limitation or Crisis? Russia and the outside World

By Kramer, John M. | Naval War College Review, Winter 1997 | Go to article overview

Damage Limitation or Crisis? Russia and the outside World


Kramer, John M., Naval War College Review


Blackwill, Robert D., and Sergei A. Karaganov, eds. Damage Limitation or Crisis? Russia and the Outside World (CSIA Studies in International Security #5) Washington, D.C.: Brassey's (US), 1994. 330pp. $18.50

This volume constitutes another addition to the scholarly debate over the future direction of Russia's foreign policy and what, if anything, the United States and its allies can do to influence it in directions congenial to their interests.

Prominent academicians from Russia and several other countries, including the United States, China, Germany, and Japan, analyze these issues thematically, assessing the prospects for democracy in Russia and delineating Russia's national interests; and regionally, by examining Russia's policy toward the "near abroad" (i.e., the other successor states of the Soviet Union) and respectively Eastern Europe, Western Europe, China and Japan, and the United States. Given Russia's current diminished role in world affairs, one might justify the omission of Russian foreign policy toward Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, and South and Southeast Asia. Less explicably, however, given the subject of its inquiry, the volume devotes no chapter to the overall status of Russia's armed forces or the military doctrine under which they operate. Also diminishing its utility is the lack of an index and bibliography; however, the essays by Robert D. Blackwill and Steven E. Miller, in particular, do include many useful bibliographical entries in their footnotes, for the interested reader.

This work offers little solace to those inside and outside Russia who hoped that a post-communist Russia would construct a "strategic partnership" with the United States to promote international peace and stability. Summarizing the conclusions of his colleagues, Blackwill states categorically that partnership between Russia and the United States is an "empty slogan" and that it "will not be easy" for these two countries even to follow his prescription to pursue policies of "damage limitation designed for narrow cooperation when possible, and seek to forestall crisis in Russia's relations with the outside world." Even more depressing, his coeditor Sergei Karaganov, Deputy Director of the Institute of Europe at the Russian Academy of Sciences, reports that Blackwill's "largely realistic and gloomy conclusions" are actually "less pessimistic" than those held by his Russian colleagues. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Damage Limitation or Crisis? Russia and the outside World
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.