The Eleanor Roosevelt Encyclopedia

By Tripp, Bernell E. | Journalism History, Winter 2002 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

The Eleanor Roosevelt Encyclopedia


Tripp, Bernell E., Journalism History


Beasley, Maurine H., Holly C. Shulman, and Henry R. Beasley, eds. The Eleanor Roosevelt Encyclopedia. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 2001. 656 pp. $65.

Eleanor Roosevelt's complex life as a First Lady, humanitarian, diplomat, and activist personifies the changing role of women in twentieth-century society. Therefore, the work by the writers and editors of the Eleanor Roosevelt Encyclopdia provides invaluable insight into her multiple interests and varied lifestyle and how her life affected both women's history and mass media history.

In the introduction, editors Maurine Beasley, Holly Schulman, and Henry Beasley note that the work is the first attempt to compile material about Roosevelt into one volume. More than 150 researchers, journalists, and professional writers contributed 237 entries that impart not only basic biographical information about her but also important facts about her contributions in six main areas: wife and mother, First Lady, humanitarian, diplomat, public communicator, and symbol of the changing position of women in the twentieth century. These six areas are addressed using three main themes: Roosevelt's network of relationships with reformers and politicians, her ability to communicate with the public through numerous media outlets, and her performance in the range of roles that encompassed her life.

Although the topics are arranged in an "A to Z format," the entries are more narrative than encyclopedic, offering anecdotal elements that detail important people and events in Roosevelt's life. Most beneficial to mass media historians are the items dealing with her interaction with media professionals, as well as her personal contributions to magazines and newspapers. For example, entries dealing with Associated Press reporter Lorena A. Hickok, a top newspaperwoman of the 1930s, and syndicated columnist Westbrook Pegler demonstrate Roosevelt's uncanny ability to establish a rapport, or a lifelong animosity, with those journalists assigned to report on her activities.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

The Eleanor Roosevelt Encyclopedia
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?