Wilderness in the Bible: Toward a Theology of Wilderness

By Dozeman, Thomas B. | Shofar, Summer 2006 | Go to article overview

Wilderness in the Bible: Toward a Theology of Wilderness


Dozeman, Thomas B., Shofar


Wilderness in the Bible: Toward a Theology of Wilderness, by Robert Barry Leal. Studies in Biblical Literature 72. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, 2004. 357 pp. $76.95.

Leal wishes to address the growing ecological crisis in the West through a study of the wilderness theme in the Hebrew Bible and its reflex in New Testament literature. The aim of the study is to construct an "ecotheology," which addresses the Australian context. Nine chapters are organized into three sections: "The Context of a Biblical Study of the Wilderness," "Biblical Attitudes Towards Wilderness," and "Towards a Theology of Wilderness."

"The Context of a Biblical Study of the Wilderness" includes a review of the current research and debate surrounding the relationship of the Judeo-Christian tradition and the natural world. Chapter 1 is a helpful overview of recent literature that criticizes the anthropocentric focus of the Judeo-Christian tradition (e.g. Lynn White) as well as the emerging voices that are seeking to reclaim a natural theology within the biblical tradition (e.g., Sallie McFague, Max Oeschlaeger, P. Santmire, J. Nash, N. Habel, D. Tracey). Chapters 2-3 explore the biblical language of the wilderness, focusing in particular on the Hebrew word, midbar, translated as "desert, wilderness, steppe." Leal provides a helpful caution for readers by distinguishing the biblical view of the wilderness from current western perspectives (chap. 2) and by noting the fluidity of meaning in the Hebrew Bible surrounding the term midbar (chap. 3). Wilderness is viewed both positively and negatively. It can be a place of testing, revelation, and nurture, as well as of rebellion and destruction. The important role of the wilderness theme in the Hebrew Bible and in the New Testament literature is indicated by its wide distribution and its diversity of meaning.

"Biblical Attitudes Towards Wilderness" is the heart of the book. Leal provides a broad overview of the theme of the wilderness throughout the diverse literature of the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament. Chapter 4 is a catalogue of the negative views of the wilderness as a place of chaos, destruction, and rebellion. Chapter 5 examines the instances where the wilderness is the setting for encountering God. This tradition begins with Hagar (Genesis 16, 21), continues through the story of Moses (Exodus 3), to the prophet Elijah (1 Kings 19). Chapter 6 explores the instances where the wilderness is the setting for divine acts of grace. The story of Hagar returns as an instance of grace in the wilderness along with the prophet tradition of the remnant (e.g., Isaiah, Hosea, Amos) and the transfiguration story of Jesus (e.g., Matthew 17). Chapter 7 explores the idealization of the wilderness as God's good creation. Leal advocates a modified form of the wilderness or nomadic ideal first suggested by K. Budde and developed further by J. W. Flight. He concludes: "The tradition of the wilderness idyll persists, albeit in fragmentary form, into the sixth century" (p.

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