Engaging in the Liberating Experience of Education

By Hopp, Carolyn Walker | Black Issues in Higher Education, March 14, 2002 | Go to article overview

Engaging in the Liberating Experience of Education


Hopp, Carolyn Walker, Black Issues in Higher Education


The ominous reports of the state of education in this country reflect the desire of American education to rigorously prepare its students to the extent that the measurement of their academic per formance can be compared to high-performing students anywhere. However, measurements of performance have evolved into high-stakes accountability, and our education systems continue to be guided -- even ruled -- by the requirements of high-stakes testing. Students of color continue to be outperformed on standardized tests, and teachers of color consistently lament unfair practices in the design and implementation of these tests. Educators seem to be spinning their wheels in their attempts to raise the level of student achievement.

In all the turmoil that high-stakes testing has created, there has been a deafening silence of practicing K-12 educators of color as leaders of conversations that address not only bridging the achievement gap, but that also address pedagogy that engages children in high-level thinking, self-actualization and liberating educational experiences -- what scholar bell hooks in 1994 called "engaged pedagogy."

When I left my high school classroom and moved into higher education, I was happy to begin working with teachers, particularly those who teach in urban settings where there are more challenges to maintaining student achievement. But, what I have come to understand goes beyond the challenges teachers in urban settings face in terms of student achievement. I have come full circle in developing understanding of my own context as an African American educator in the College of Education at a metropolitan university. My voice is indeed important in the conversations and writing about teacher practice, and what it means to engage students in meaningful learning and conversations that challenge views of their world -- and mine. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Engaging in the Liberating Experience of Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.