Change Management in the Social Housing Sector: A Fad or a Requirement?

By Abdalla, Elhadi | Management Services, March 2002 | Go to article overview

Change Management in the Social Housing Sector: A Fad or a Requirement?


Abdalla, Elhadi, Management Services


Change Management

Managers in the social housing sector have considered the management of change ever since management emerged as a discipline in its own right. While some of the challenges facing small social housing landlords are novel, many of them may benefit from the application of concepts that were developed several years ago.

There are several reasons why change management may not work for the smaller housing associations:

* Change management is a mixture of so many disciplines

* A valuable contribution has been made only in last few years

* There are different methods adopted

* Some materials on change management are not readily available to the smaller housing associations.

* The concept contains a number of academic schools of thought which can make it difficult to understand.

Does Change Management work?

Many of the smaller groups in the voluntary sector will be asking: does change management work? I will try to answer the question from my experience. However, it is important to know that the answer may not be straightforward since although it may work for some it will not for others.

For the smaller groups, change management means analysing the causes of the presenting problems, designing the change programme and implementing and evaluating it. It can be a valuable tool but it may be applied in a situation for which it is not appropriate. Even in the larger charities, change management professionals have different views of the underlying causes and problems. This means you may measure different outcomes, or measure them differently. The question is whose measure is to be used as the benchmark of best practice? This makes the task of introducing change sometimes difficult.

Perhaps for these reasons managers of the smaller charities may face some difficulties with change management tools. What I found interesting is that change management advisors or gurus prescribe courses of action without any basis in evidence. I see this as part of the problem, not the solution.

Can we plan for change?

Sometimes change is deliberate, a product of conscious reasoning and actions. This type of change is called planned change. In contrast, change sometimes unfolds in an apparently spontaneous and unplanned way. This type of change is known as emergent change. You may make a decision apparently unrelated to the change that emerges. The change is therefore not planned. However, this decision may be based on unspoken, and sometimes unconscious, assumptions about your organisation, the requirements of the funding bodies, and therefore, it is not as unrelated as it first seems. Such implicit assumptions dictate the direction of the seemingly disparate and unrelated decision.

External factors such as funding, mergers and losing a contract or internal features eg board members uncertainty or personal agenda may influence a change in direction totally outside your control.

What is important in change management?

I would draw your attention to two things:

* You need to identify, explore and if necessary challenge the assumptions that underlie the change before it is introduced.

* Understanding that organisational change is a process that you may want to facilitate by perceptive and insightful planning and analysis and well crafted, sensitive implementation phases, while acknowledging that it is never fully isolated from the effects of uncertainty.

How much can we learn from the private sector?

A key consideration for charities is that many of the accepted change management techniques are derived from the private sector. The question is to what extent can the knowledge, theory and models developed in the context of the private sector be successfully transferred to and implemented within housing associations. Results show that applications in the voluntary sector displayed a pattern of results very similar to that in the private sector. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Change Management in the Social Housing Sector: A Fad or a Requirement?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.