Whose Religion Is Christianity? the Gospel beyond the West

By Mbuvi, Andrew M. | Anglican Theological Review, Summer 2006 | Go to article overview

Whose Religion Is Christianity? the Gospel beyond the West


Mbuvi, Andrew M., Anglican Theological Review


Whose Religion is Christianity? The Gospel beyond the West. By Lamin Sanneh. Grand Rapids, Mich.: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 2003. xii + 138 pp. $12.00 (paper).

Christianity has survived the Christendom guilt complex of the West and today thrives as a post-Western religion in the global South. Not only has the population of Christians in the South overtaken those in the North, this development also has had major implications for world Christianity. This is the primary argument in this short hut important book. The subtitle might be misleading, however, since the book's focus is primarily on Africa and not the whole of the global South.

A quick glance at this book and one might think that this is simply a popular version of the author's earlier, award-winning book Translating the Message: The Missionary Impact on Culture. Although Whose Religion is Christianity? appears to be a distillation of this earlier work, it turns out to be much more than that. True, Sanneh intends to reach a broader audience with this smaller and more popularly written volume; nevertheless, the book leaves no doubt as to the significance of the question it poses in its title. Even with the focus being on "brevity, clarity and dispatch" (p. 11), the urgency of the message is never in doubt.

Whose Religion is Christianity? goes beyond the questions of historical development of the reality of the predominance of Christianity in the global South (addressed in Translating the Message) to the implications of this reality in relation to Western Christianity. For a little book, it packs quite a punch in its breadth and scope of material covered providing serious food for thought for the reader. Issues ranging from the form of Christianity that is being formulated outside of the confines of Western theological ethos to the critical examination of such popular terminology as "global" are closely scrutinized.

Sanneh makes a significant distinction between what he calls "World Christianity" ("a variety of indigenous responses' to the gospel message) and "Global Christianity" ("the faithful replication of the Christian forms and patterns developed in Europe") (p. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Whose Religion Is Christianity? the Gospel beyond the West
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.