What Will You Wear to the Revolution? Thatcher's Genderation and the Fashioning of Change

By Brabazon, Tara | Hecate, January 1, 1996 | Go to article overview

What Will You Wear to the Revolution? Thatcher's Genderation and the Fashioning of Change


Brabazon, Tara, Hecate


What Will You Wear To the Revolution? Thatcher's Genderation and the Fashioning of Change

A 1989 edition of Marxism Today, the journal derived from the Communist Party of Great Britain, headed a page with the slogan `What will you wear to the revolution?'(1) This statement showed the impact of both Thatcherism and identity politics on British Marxism: New Times ruptured old beliefs. The crisis of the Left, inspired not only by neo-liberal politics but a female Prime Minister, produced radical reconceptualisations of the welfare state, Scottish and Welsh nationalism, gay and lesbian rights and the uneasy link between the labour and feminist movements. Unfortunately for the British Labour Party, if any person were to claim the adjectival description of revolutionary then it would be Margaret Thatcher. When mines closed, Body Shops opened. Nationalised industries made way for a share-holding citizenry. The Labour Party held caveats on social democratic rhetoric but was defending class allegiances that increasingly had popular support only in Scotland and the north-west of England. Once more, the Left had to be defensive, rather than innovative, in policy formations.

The New Times project,(2) which was instigated in the pages of Marxism Today, aimed to decentre class-based unities in favour of feminist, gay, postcolonial and youth-based struggles. Evidently, the post-1968 generations had grown bored with questions of labour surplus and the late capitalist mode of production. It was left to Stuart Hall, co-founder of the New Times project (with Martin Jacques), to articulate the dilemma for progressives.

A tiny bit of all of us is also somewhere inside the Thatcherite project. Of course, we're all one hundred per cent committed. But every now and then -- Saturday mornings, perhaps, just before the demonstration -- we go to Sainsbury's and we're just a tiny bit of a Thatcherite subject...(3)

This paper builds on Hall's disclosure, questioning the role of clothes and bodily inscriptions within the formulation of post-Thatcherite feminism. Certainly, the Iron Lady instigated destructive changes to the status of British women.(4) What I am interested in considering is how understandings of radicalism and revolutionary actions were changed for young women and feminist researchers by the Thatcher years. Through Marxism Today, it seemed that the Left had finally erased the border between the trivial and the serious, the connection between clothes and change (or frocks and politics).(5)

Recently, many of these identity affinities and cultural practices have been dismissed as cultural populism. My paper is written in response to Llewellyn Negrin's recent article in Arena Journal. She stated that a

danger with the postmodern celebration of rebellion through fashion is that of substituting revolution in dress for real social change. In the postmodern era, rebellion has primarily taken the form of projecting a certain image through the clothes one wears, rather than engaging with the economic and political structures which produce social inequality.(6)

This is a cheap shot at frocks (and postmodernism).(7) Fabrics are woven with meanings that allow space for play and carnivalesque strategies. It is not simply `clever clever' cultural studies to affirm the importance of style to politics. Thatcher's success was built in part on her high heels and carefully groomed hair as well as her policies. In constructing a new dreaming for a declining Britain, she represented the greatest change possible: a female Prime Minister who was `the best man for the job.' The mistake made by Labour leaders before Tony Blair was precisely the same as that articulated by Negrin: an underestimation of style in the process and formulation of change.

This project attempts to unravel the decade of power dressing, shoulder pads and filofaxes. Clothes are markers of gender and sexuality: fabric signifies (in)subordination. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

What Will You Wear to the Revolution? Thatcher's Genderation and the Fashioning of Change
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.