Vladimir Putin and the New World Order: Looking East, Looking West?

By Harasymiw, Bohdan | Canadian Slavonic Papers, March-June 2006 | Go to article overview

Vladimir Putin and the New World Order: Looking East, Looking West?


Harasymiw, Bohdan, Canadian Slavonic Papers


J. L. Black. Vladimir Putin and the New World Order: Looking East, Looking West? Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2004. xiv, 366 pp. Appendix. Bibliography. Index.

What or who determines Russia's foreign policy? Is NATO a genuine, or merely a symbolic, threat to Russia? Does Russia really count in world affairs today? Why does Russia not just mind its own business instead of trying to play the great power that it no longer clearly is? Such questions arise only implicitly out of the book under review, and that may be its sole redeeming feature-providing grist for the mill wherever Russian foreign policy is being discussed.

Based on a graduate course taught at Carleton University by historian Larry Black, and a continuation of his earlier study of NATO expansion (Russia Faces NATO Expansion: Bearing Gifts or Bearing Arms?[Lanham, Maryland: Rowman and Littlefield, 200O]), this book is a meticulously detailed chronology of what took place in Russia's international relations between January 2000 and May 2002. It offers a Russian perspective on all of the country's foreign policy dealings during that period gleaned from a close reading of the Russian press, augmented by official statements and press releases. Unlike unnamed other narratives it promises "a comprehensive analysis" (p. 3), but fails to deliver, unless analysis is counted in terms of verbiage. Adopting as he does a Russian prism on events. Black succeeds repeatedly in tweaking the beak of the Great American Eagle, yet is less successful in explaining much about the Russian policy itself.

The book is divided into two parts, the first of which deals mainly with the ups and downs of Russia-United States relations, referring to the two-and-a-half years under review as a period of experimentation. The second part treats Russia's relations with other specific parts of the world: the Caucasus; Ukraine and Belarus; the CIS; India and China; and the Middle East and "Rogue States" (Libya, North Korea, and Iran and Iraq). Every chapter is a carefully documented recitation of the actions of key decision makers (President Vladimir Putin and his ministers and generals) and of the statements of these key individuals as well as countless Russian journalists, commentators, and policy wonks. While the thoroughness and detail of just what was said by whom at what time and on what occasion may have some value for the historical record, the author provides no guidance or interpretation to sort out whose opinions really counted.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Vladimir Putin and the New World Order: Looking East, Looking West?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.