President's Perspective


It is hard to believe that I am writing my last column for Techniques. The time has flown by! As I review the past several months, it is evident that ACTE is undergoing a great change, and we will be stronger in the future due to your willingness to embrace that change.

A year ago, I was appointed chair of the Executive Director Search Committee-a major undertaking, as our association was faced with many challenges. I know you will agree that we made the right choice in selecting Jan Bray. ACTE is moving forward, and our future is bright! I would like to share some highlights of the year and our plans for the future.

The ACTE Board of Directors has embarked upon a new strategic planning process. Membership input and involvement will be accomplished through surveys, town hall meetings at state and region conferences and through our Web site. Leadership at all levels of ACTE will be included in the ongoing process. The future of our association is in all of our hands, and it is essential that we work together.

Our voice in Congress is strong! Through our lobbying efforts, the FY02 funding appropriations included an $80 million dollar increase in the Perkins basic state grant-a seven percent increase over the previous year. As we gear up for Perkins reauthorization, we have increased our government relations staff to two full-time positions. Our thanks to Nancy O'Brien for her efforts, and we welcome Alisha Dixon. Together they make a powerful advocacy team for CTE.

ACTE testified at a hearing held by the U.S Office of Vocational and Adult Education on proposed changes to the Perkins Act. We have also had several meetings with Assistant Secretary Carol D'Amico to share the needs and concerns of the career and technical education field.

ACTE has promoted career and technical education through the dissemination of promotional and educational materials to schools in celebration of Career and Technical Education Week. We also coordinated visits by the assistant secretary to CTE classrooms in the Washington area.

Our 2001 annual convention was a huge success. The Board and staff made several changes to the convention format based on recommendations from the Professional Development Committee. Our convention will continue to improve to meet the professional and leadership development needs of our members as we continue to embrace change. The 2002 convention will have policy and leadership strands in addition to division content sessions. Julia Richardson and her staff are to be commended for their efforts to make our convention the "place to be" for career and technical educators.

ACTE has brought efficiency and proper management control to its financial and accounting processes. The addition of Brenda Fritz as director of finance and operations has led to timely processing of invoices and receipts. She and her very capable staff have put into place proper internal controls that ensure all ACTE movies are properly recorded and expended in line with the approved budget.

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