Films Chosen for Library of Congress National Film Registry

American Cinematographer, February 1996 | Go to article overview

Films Chosen for Library of Congress National Film Registry


The Library of Congress has selected 25 motion pictures for the National Film Registry, a list established by Congress' Film Preservation Act of 1988 for preservation in the National Film Collection of the Library of Congress. The Registry, now numbering 175 entries, was created in response to increasing concern about the protection and preservation of motion pictures - as approximately half of the movies made before 1950 have deteriorated beyond repair. The Library of Congress endeavors to obtain and maintain an archival-quality original version of each of the chosen films.

The choices have been made by the Librarian of Congress, following consultation with the National Film Board, critics, historians, the public, the staff of the Library's Motion Picture, Broadcasting and Recorded Sound Division, and several industry organizations including the Screen Director's Guild and the ASC. The choices are not intended to be a list of "best" films, but are selected as being "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant." A film is not eligible for consideration until at least ten years after its initial release.

The films and their cinematographers are:

The Adventures of Robin Hood

Tony Gaudio, ASC, Sol Polito, ASC, W. Howard Greene, ASC

Warner Bros/First National, 1938, Technicolor

All That Heaven Allows

Russell Metty, ASC

Universal, 1955, Technicolor

American Grafitti

Haskell Wexler, ASC, Ron Eveslage, Jan D'Alquen

Universal, 1973, Technicolor

The Band Wagon

Harry Jackson, ASC

MGM, 1953, Technicolor

Blacksmith Scene

Edison, 1893, silent short

Cabaret

Geoffrey Unsworth

Allied Artists, 1972, Technicolor

Chan is Missing

Michael Chin

Wayne Wang, 1982, black-and-white

The Conversation

Bill Butler, ASC

Paramount, 1974, Technicolor

The Day the Earth Stood Still

Leo Tover, ASC

Fox, 1951, black-and-white

EI Norte

James Glennon, ASC

Independent Productions/Cinecom-Island Alive, 1983, color

Fatty's Tintype Tangle

Keystone Film Company/Mutual Film Corporation, 1915, silent

The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse

John Seitz, ASC

MGM, 1921, silent with musical accompaniment

Fury

Joseph Ruttenberg, ASC

MGM, 1936, black-and-white

Gerald McBoing Boing

UPA/Columbia, 1951, animated short

The Hospital

Victor Kemper, ASC

United Artists, 1971, color

Jammin' the Blues

Robert Burks, ASC

Vitaphone, Warner Bros. …

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Films Chosen for Library of Congress National Film Registry
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