Book Notes

The Arkansas Historical Quarterly, Spring 2002 | Go to article overview

Book Notes


The fall of 2001 brought the inaugural issue of the South Arkansas Historical Journal. The handsome thirty-two page volume is edited by Shea Wilson and published by the South Arkansas Historical Society. The journal's six articles offer something for nearly every historical taste, and include: Ben Whitfield's detailed examination of El Dorado's two-year colleges; John G. Ragsdale's survey of the fifty-year history of the Shuler Drilling Company and his discussion of the Mayhaw tree and the jelly derived from its fruit; Don Lambert's recreation of the excitement surrounding Samuel T. Busey's oil strike through the use of oral histories collected by the Arkansas Museum of Natural Resources; Hazel Sample Guyol's recollections of El Dorado in the 1920s; and Phillip Arndt's reflections on General Frederick Steele's retreat from Camden during the Civil War. To subscribe or for more information, please contact the South Arkansas Historical Society at P.O. Box 10201, El Dorado, AR 71730-0201.

Kay Marnon Danielson's Eureka Springs, Arkansas has recently appeared as part of Arcadia Publishing's Images of America series. Like other books in this series, it features a short introduction followed by hundreds of historic photographs of the town and its people. Both the photographs and their detailed captions capture the history of this town, one of only a dozen to be designated a "Distinctive Destination" by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Available for $19.99 (paper), the book can be ordered from the press at 3047 North Lincoln Avenue, Suite 410, Chicago, IL 60657 or (773) 549-7002.

Given the presence of Arkansas regiments in western Tennessee, readers should take note of Stephen D. Engle's Struggle for the Heartland: The Campaigns from Fort Henry to Corinth, recently published by the University of Nebraska Press as part of its Great Campaigns of the Civil War series, edited by Anne J. Bailey and Brooks Simpson. …

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