Orisa: Yoruba Gods and Spiritual Identity in Africa and the Diaspora

By Otero, Solimar | The International Journal of African Historical Studies, May 1, 2006 | Go to article overview

Orisa: Yoruba Gods and Spiritual Identity in Africa and the Diaspora


Otero, Solimar, The International Journal of African Historical Studies


Orisa: Yoruba Gods and Spiritual Identity in Africa and the Diaspora. Edited by Toyin FaIoIa and Ann Geneva. Trenton, N.J.: Africa World Press, 2005. Pp. ix, 457. $34.95 paper.

Falola and Genova have put together an interesting set of essays for those interested in orisha traditions as found in transnational contexts. Taking the premise that traditional orisha worship is indeed becoming a world religion, most of the authors in the volume address questions of cultural flow, authenticity, and practice in shifting and shared geographical contexts. As the volume's apt title suggests, the pieces put together create a montage of analysis that both support and deflect the notion of cultural, ethnic, racial, and social purity for Yoruba religious scholars and practitioners in Africa and in its Diaspora. Of particular interest to writers in the volume like Michael Marcuzzi, Jo Anna Hunter, and Anthony Attah Agbali is the role that the Cuban manifestation of orisha worship, La Regla de Ocha or Santeria, has played in both preserving old and extending new meanings and praxis of orisha worship as a global practice. However, in an attempt to highlight the depth of Yoruba epistemology present in the performance of contemporary Diasporic religious philosophy and ritual, the authors in this volume overlook the necessary role that creolization and nationalism have played in making orisha worship a central part of racially mixed and ethnically layered identities in the Caribbean, Brazil, and the United States, especially.

This said, the knowledge and depth of the issues presented in the volume speak to central concerns apparent to any serious student of Yoruba traditional religion. For example, K. Noel Amherd's piece on Ifa divination texts, "Ifa Texts: Diversity and Discourse," is a sober reconsideration of the role that the performance of the Ese Ifa verse plays in its metadiscursive unpacking. In other words, it is the dialogic moment and the polyphonic aspect of a verse, in its telling, that should inform and guide readings of the verse. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Orisa: Yoruba Gods and Spiritual Identity in Africa and the Diaspora
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.