P&G's A.G. Lafley Honored

Chief Executive (U.S.), September 2006 | Go to article overview

P&G's A.G. Lafley Honored


After the closing bell on July 12, more than 200 of America's business leaders and their guests filled the floor of the New York Stock Exchange to honor the 2006 Chief Executive of the Year, A.C. Lafley. In assuming the title, Lafley joined a list notable for including luminaries such as Jack Welch, Andy Grove, Herb Kelleher, Michael Dell and Bill Gates.

The 29-year P&G veteran was an "easy choice" for Chief Executive magazine's selection panel, outgoing CEO of the Year George David, chairman and CEO of United Technologies, told the crowd. "A.G. Lafley is known for productivity, operating income, performance and most of all for P&G's commitments to the highest standards of corporate governance and environmental stewardship," said David. "Total shareholder return at P&G since he became CEO in 2000 is 60 percent-decisively over the Dow Industrial average of 16 percent for that time period-at a time of flatter markets for large cap companies in America."

And shareholder return is just one measure of the revitalization engineered by Lafley at the 169-year old institution's helm. Steering a strategy of cost-cutting coupled with product innovations, he reenergized core brands -including Pampers, Tide and Crest-plagued by flattened volumes and shrinking profit margins. Leading acquisitions of Clairol in 2001, Wella in 2003 and Gillette in 2005, he further strengthened the company's product portfolio, bringing operating margins to an impressive 19. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

P&G's A.G. Lafley Honored
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.