Your Web-Wise Kid

By Gerstenzang, Susan | Working Mother, September 2006 | Go to article overview

Your Web-Wise Kid


Gerstenzang, Susan, Working Mother


If you've ever been perplexed by the Internet's seemingly unlimited amount of information, you can bet your child is, too. In fact, the Web was created primarily for adults, says Joyce Kasman Valenza, the librarian at Springfield Township High School in Erdenheim, PA, and a former tech columnist for The Philadelphia Inquirer. So whether your child is reporting on the Civil War or the current one in Iraq, how can you help her find the right stuff online and make sure she doesn't just cut and paste it into her paper?

The first challenge is finding the right online resources. Although many think Google is the best search engine, it may not be the right starting spot for kids. "In a Google search, the best result may appear on page 20," says Valenza, "and your child may never get to it." But if she searches a specialized subscription database or a kid-friendly space (see "Click Here!"), she may find what she needs faster. School and public libraries offer students access to many databases, often designed for kids age by age.

With a good search tool, your child can type in "U.S. Civil War" and get a list of relevant links to a variety of media-books, magazine articles, other websites, downloadable video. This allows her to explore the topic in different ways through a variety of resources and maximize research time.

Since anyone can create an Internet site, assessing a source's validity is crucial. Sites of academic institutions and journals (typically .edu), government (.gov) and many nonprofits (.org), such as the American Heart Association, are often worth checking. But sites may have a narrow viewpoint. So if the topic is a controversial one, like global warming, your student should use multiple resources to get the big picture. "Help her evaluate by looking together at her bibliography," Valenza advises. "Do the sources seem valid to you?

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Your Web-Wise Kid
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.