Hone Your Most Important Job-Hunting Skill

By Cejka, Sue | Medical Economics, April 14, 1997 | Go to article overview

Hone Your Most Important Job-Hunting Skill


Cejka, Sue, Medical Economics


Why do some physicians land prestigious, high-paying jobs in America's most sought-after locations, while other doctors, with comparable experience and credentials, get only ho-hum offers in remote areas after months or years of frustration and rejection?

The reason, in a word, is connections. How good your next job is may depend less on what you know than on whom you know. To meet people who can give you an edge, join your national specialty society or at least its state chapter, as well as your state and county medical societies. Attend their meetings and major events, and start networking.

When meeting people at association events who can help you move up, try these tips: Bring and distribute plenty of business cards. Request a business card from each person you meet. Carry a small note pad and pen to jot down the particulars about people. Also note the names of spouses, children, birthdays, hobbies, sports, and other special interests that may arise in conversation. Remembering such personal details makes subsequent conversations easier.

Be patient. Networking takes time. Keep in touch with key people you've met. A phone call, note, or even E-mail message after an event to tell someone how much you enjoyed meeting him is a good start. If your group produces a newsletter, or if you have an article published, send copies with a short personal message.

Renew acquaintances. When the next organization function comes up, contact the people you previously met, ask them whether they plan to attend, and make plans to meet at the event to renew your acquaintance.

Eoin a committee of an organization to which you belong. Working with fellow committee members is probably the single best way to enlarge your sphere of information and influence.

If you seek to become a physician executive, be prepared to go where the jobs are, and join national organizations that offer the scope you'll need. Listed below are the best bets. All will send you promotional literature and a calendar of upcoming events, which are also accessible at the Web sites listed.

American College of Healh,are Executives One North Franklin St. Chicago, Ill. 60606-3491 312-4242800 Fax: 312424-0023

Internet: http://www.ache.org Members: about 30,000 Dues: $250 annually

America's most influential health-care executives attend ACHE functions. Interested in management? ACHE's approximately 140 educational programs offer excellent networking potential. …

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