Contemporary Possibilities of Music Therapy in Social Psychiatry and Alcohology

By Jagetic, Nada; Breitenfeld, Darko et al. | Alcoholism, July 1, 2005 | Go to article overview

Contemporary Possibilities of Music Therapy in Social Psychiatry and Alcohology


Jagetic, Nada, Breitenfeld, Darko, Thaller, Vlatko, Prstacic, Miroslav, et al., Alcoholism


Summary - This paper presents the contemporary possibilities of music therapy in social psychiatry and especially in combating alcoholism, based on the pieces of experience from the Department of Psychiatry within the Sestre milosrdnice University Hospital, Zagreb, and on the activities related to music therapy with the short-time patients, mainly alcoholics,who were first treated in the hospital and later in the clubs of treated alcoholics. (Alcoholism 2005; 41: 107-111)

Key words: Psychiatry, Music therapy; Alcoholism; Club of treated alcoholics

Within the framework of restructuring or reorganizing of social classes, the modern social psychiatry witnesses the appearance of new disturbances, new diseases surface, and some great, especially marginal social groups are created.1 Therefore, the new methods of treatment are needed which would aid a larger number of people, generally the marginal groups. Owing to a multitude of patients, the treatment is possible only in groups, using also the pieces of knowledge from social sciences.2 There is a tendency to create institutions close enough to the patients' places of residence or rather as near as possible to their real, ordinary, "normal" life. Patients should be activated in such life - within the therapeutic community and aided by therapists, and especially by themselves - to persist in detecting their personal wrong attitudes and adjusting to worthly group living and particularly in helping the others.3 For the purpose of adaptation to the real conditions, some new forms of institutions have been created, duration of stay in institutions has been shortened, the emphasis has been laid on treatment in community i.e. regional treatment in the outpatient departments, health care centers and especially the treated patients clubs.

Therefore, the music treatment, otherwise fairly recognized worldwide in terms of classic psychiatry, must be adapted to such circumstances.4 There is no question about the asylum-related creation of "exemplary orchestras", long-term learning of instruments, without thinking of the needs of patients after their leave the institution (that they often did not leave anyway) and the attitude of quiet awaiting in motivating and socializing the patients.5 However, clear, relatively modest and close goals are necessary, where a "part of the job" is left to music therapists in regional institutions. Almost all patients have to become qualified to leave the institution. None of them is imperceptive for music, so it is often necessary to work a lot with all of them, and even more effort ought to be taken in more difficult cases.

Music is a suitable, acceptable and very efficient means to bring a man back to society, create a good mood, but also to promote the discipline, which is necessary in every.6,7 In order to educate the patients in musical terms, theoretically and practically, to play an instrument, which he needs to get along better and for be better accepted in the society to which he will come back soon, we must use the abbreviated methods of teaching the simple instruments, such as guitar, harmonica (mouth organ), percussion instruments, melodicas (mouth-pianos), and especially our national instrument "tamburitza" (whose some accompanying larger forms such as alt tamburitza,8 bass and others can be learned in its fundamentals in a couple of days or during several rehearsals). People have to be stimulated and get used to play by ear, to know how to join the quickly created groups or bands where the mutual cohesion and technical and human composition has to be quickly achieved. The music we select may have some educational elements, but the patient has to be approached during a short period primarily with the music known to him.9 We apply the music therapy in the frame of all forms of institutional medical treatment - from day-hospital treatment to weekend-treatment, and if necessary, even through night hospital treatments, especially in the afternoon treatment types for alcoholics who work regularly at their workplaces during the morning hours.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Contemporary Possibilities of Music Therapy in Social Psychiatry and Alcohology
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.