PRESERVING INEQUALITY IN CANADA: Harper's Cuts Are Designed to Keep the Neo-Cons on Top

By Russell, Frances | CCPA Monitor, November 2006 | Go to article overview

PRESERVING INEQUALITY IN CANADA: Harper's Cuts Are Designed to Keep the Neo-Cons on Top


Russell, Frances, CCPA Monitor


It's every man for himself, the elephant said as he danced among the chickens. That was Tommy Douglas's metaphor to remind audiences that government alone can redress the inherent inequality between the powerful and the powerless in society.

The elephant is once again dancing among the chickens. Critics of the Harper Conservative government's $1 billion fat-trimming call it deeply ideological. The cuts overwhelmingly affect Canada's most marginalized citizens. Most ideological of all is the abolition of the Court Challenges Program (CCP) and the Law Commission of Canada. Both have been advancing the rights of the vulnerable.

Despite their professed Christian beliefs, many theological and social conservatives have a strong survival-of-the-fittest streak. They want a hierarchical society with heterosexual white males at the top. They despise "social engineering" and "judicial activism," their epithets for the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

Theo-cons and socio-cons, like REAL Women, complain they're the abused minority because they don't get CCP funding. But the CCP was designed to promote equality, and REAL Women has opposed every initiative on women's equality. As Tommy Douglas might say, the elephant hardly needs help to dance among the chickens.

Now theo-cons and socio-cons have a powerful friend at court. Ian Brodie is Prime Minister Stephen Harper's chief of staff and the intellectual arch-foe of the CCP's affirmative action to promote the rights of French Canadians, women, Aboriginals, gays, immigrants, and the disabled.

Brodie devoted his career as a political scientist to attacking the CCP. In a rare interview in 2001, Brodie said Ottawa only funds a left-wing agenda. "They (the CCP) were in favour of extending language rights, whatever the claim was. And they were in favour of as stringent a feminist interpretation of the equality rights section as you could possibly have, to the exclusion of all others... They're heavily funding the one side. It happens to be the gay-rights side, the pro-pornography side, the feminist side, the abortion issue. The government here is not acting as a neutral arbiter between competing claims of what social policy ought to look like in Canada. I'm outraged as a taxpayer..."

Both Brodie and Harper are graduates of the Calgary School, a group of University of Calgary political scientists including Tom Flanagan, another right-hand man to Harper, Barry Cooper, David Bercuson, and Ted Morton. Neoconservatives all, they follow the teachings of German-America political philosopher Leo Strauss.

Father of the neo-conservative movement, Strauss had a deep antipathy towards liberal democracy and its supposed moral relativism. He had a number of jarring beliefs: that society had to be governed by a small intellectual-and male-élite who would use "noble lies" to keep the rabble in check; that religion and fear must be used to control the masses; and that perpetual war is humanity's natural condition. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

PRESERVING INEQUALITY IN CANADA: Harper's Cuts Are Designed to Keep the Neo-Cons on Top
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.