Social Skills: Part One.The Early Years through Elementary Schools

By Drill, Janet | Teaching Exceptional Children, January/February 1997 | Go to article overview

Social Skills: Part One.The Early Years through Elementary Schools


Drill, Janet, Teaching Exceptional Children


We know that social competence plays a crucial role in the participation and inclusion of individuals with disabilities and gifts in school and in the community. Most children develop an awareness of acceptable social skills by observing those around them. However, some children may need some special directed teaching to become aware of proper social skills and extra practice to fully develop these skills. The following documents recently entered into the databases address these issues.

In the Early Years

EC611401. Strategies That Promote Social Skills in Toddlers with Special Needs in the Inclusive Setting. Barbara Lowenthal. (1995). Infant-Toddler Intervention: The Transdisciplinary Journal, S(1),15-22. Singular Publishing Group, Inc., Journals Department, 4284 41st Street, San Diego, CA, 92105-1197. This article describes strategies to assist toddlers with special needs in inclusive settings to acquire social interaction skills. Strategies include arranging the environment, group affection activities, imitation of peers, teacher reinforcement, correspondence training, and peer-mediated interventions.

EC612453. Peer-Inclusive Social Skills Groups for Young Children with Behavioral Risks. Debra M. Kamps. (1995). Preventing School Failure, 39(4), 10-15. A social intervention for 4 and 5 year olds exhibiting behavior problems is described. The multiyear social skills program includes direct instruction of social skills, incidental teaching, and reinforcement procedures. Training of school staff and program implementation are highlighted. Observable improvements in peer interactions resulted from program implementation.

EC613026. "Buddy Skills" for Preschoolers. Kris English & Others. (1996). TEACHING Exceptional Children, 28(3), 62-66. (UMI) This article describes an 11-step "buddy" skills training procedure that helps children in an inclusive preschool work and play together more cooperatively. Steps include initial assessment, sensitization, peer training, implementation, positive reinforcement, evaluation, targeting specific interaction skills, teaching interaction skills, and fading.

EC900471. Social Competence of Young Children with Disabilities: Issues and Strategies for Intervention. Samuel L. Odom & Others, Editors. (1992). Paul H. Brookes Publishing Company, P.O. Box 10624, Baltimore, MD 21285-0624. 1-800638-3775. This book provides a summary of current knowledge about the social competence of young children with disabilities and intervention practices to promote social competence. The first section addresses theoretical and practical issues related to social competence. The second section examines the range of social interaction interventions for young children with disabilities.

EC611561. Social Interaction: Assessment and Intervention with Regard to Students Who Are Deaf. Barbara LuetkeStahlam. (1995). American Annals of the Deaf, 140, 295-303. (UMI) Tools and approaches to promote the development of social skills among students who are deaf are presented. Social skills assessment inventories are described, and six commercially available curricula are identified. Examples of goals and objectives are provided, as well as suggestions to facilitate social integration of deaf and hearing students.

EC612458. Naturalistic Peer Interventions for Promoting Preschool Children's Social Interactions. William H. Brown & Samuel L. Odom. (1995). Preventing School Failure, 39(4), 38-43. (UMI) Incidental teaching of social behavior and friendship activities are naturalistic peer interventions that can be easily incorporated into preschool curricula for children with or without special needs. This article provides a rationale for these two strategies, a 10-step program for implementing incidental social behavior instruction, and suggestions for activities to develop friendships.

In the Elementary School

ED391304. Effective Strategies for Teaching Appropriate Behaviors to Children with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders. …

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