Data Response and Case Studies for Advanced Level Business

By Moran, Geoff | Teaching Business & Economics, Spring 2002 | Go to article overview

Data Response and Case Studies for Advanced Level Business


Moran, Geoff, Teaching Business & Economics


Data Response and Case Studies for Advanced Level Business, Andrew Gillespie, Hodder & Stoughton, 2001, ring-bound paperback, 287 pages, L44.99, ISBN 0-340-- 80178-6,Tel. 01235 827720. www.hodderheadline.co.uk

Andrew Gillespie's work will be familiar to most Business Studies teachers through his work with AQA Business Studies and his various textbooks. This latest offering comes in the form of a ring bound set of photocopiable case studies designed to cover the specifications of the new AS, A2 and AVCE examinations in Business Studies.

The topics follow the structure of the exam specifications, starting with 'Marketing' and running through to 'Objectives and Strategies'. The coverage is quite comprehensive, with a total of 196 case studies of various length and complexity over the seven topics. The case studies are clearly numbered, and reference the relevant sections of the AQA, OCR and Edexcel specifications, including whether they are aimed primarily at AS or A2 students. This makes it relatively easy to build them into an individual scheme of work. Most of the case studies are accompanied by brief notes on the content, giving the student some context in which to see the information on which they are working. Some also give explanations of 'key terms' found within the text. These are useful additions which will prove helpful to students, particularly those taking the AS exams.

The content of the case studies varies, so that they can be used with a range of students. I have tried them out on students taking AS and A2 Business Studies and also with a group of Advanced AVCE Business students. Each group handled them well. They commented on the mark allocation as a useful device for indicating the amount of content they should be putting into their answers - good examination practice! In this respect, it might have been helpful to give an indication of the time that should be allowed for each case study. However, this is generally fairly evident from the exercise itself.

At the end of the book some sample marking schemes are given. Although of necessity these are general in nature, they do provide a helpful outline of the way in which marks are awarded and as such are as useful to students as to the teacher who is marking their work. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Data Response and Case Studies for Advanced Level Business
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.