Workers' Compensation: Benefits, Costs and Safety under Alternative Insurance Arrangements

By Worrall, John D. | Journal of Risk and Insurance, March 2002 | Go to article overview

Workers' Compensation: Benefits, Costs and Safety under Alternative Insurance Arrangements


Worrall, John D., Journal of Risk and Insurance


Workers' Compensation: Benefits, Costs and Safety Under Alternative Insurance Arrangements, by Terry Thomason, Timothy P Schmidle, and John F. Burton Jr., 2001, Kalamazoo, Michigan: W. E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research

Reviewer: John D. Worrall, Rutgers University

This book succeeds on many fronts and is a must-buy for those working in social insurance, human resources, or public policy. The careful construction of a cross-sectional time series on the costs of workers' compensation alone would be a major contribution and worth the price of the book, facilitating research on the changing structure of workers' compensation programs. However, the book actually uses the series to examine the adequacy, equity, and efficiency of the workers' compensation system. The authors update previous studies, Krueger and Burton (1990) and Schmidle (1994), for example, and they price both the essential recommendations of the National Commission on State Workmen's Compensation Laws and the Model Act of the Council of State Governments. They consider public vs. private provision and the injury prevention role of workers' compensation programs.

Those familiar with the research programs of the three authors, all experienced scholars who have made many contributions to social insurance research, will see the influence each has had on the final product. Although each is interested in theory and econometrics, the authors go to great pains to make the book accessible to the general reader. They explain technical points in good English and clearly spell out the public policy aspects of the research.

After a brief overview (Chapter 1), the authors present an especially well-written Chapter 2 on workers' compensation program developments since the 1960s. This will provide a quick review for those who have followed workers' compensation programs closely and a strong basis for the research to come for those unfamiliar with workers' compensation research. Chapter 3 provides the data foundation for the multivariate statistical research that follows in Chapters 4, 5, 7, and 8 (Chapter 6 sets out the theory and reviews the effect of rate regulation).

The authors provide detailed information on the construction of their cross-sectional time series. They are able to build a consistent series for workers' compensation class codes, which account for approximately 75 percent of premium. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Workers' Compensation: Benefits, Costs and Safety under Alternative Insurance Arrangements
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.