Fashioning Gothic Bodies

By Hopkins, Lisa | Gothic Studies, November 2006 | Go to article overview

Fashioning Gothic Bodies


Hopkins, Lisa, Gothic Studies


Fashioning Gothic Bodies by Catherine Spooner (Manchester:Manchester University Press, 2004), ISBN: 7190 6400 7, 224pp., £47.50 hb; 0 7190 6401 5, 224pp., £15.99 pb.

Catherine Spooner's Fashioning Gothic Bodies is an ambitious and interesting project; above all, it is the kind you are glad someone else has done, since it requires detailed knowledge of two fields not previously studied in conjunction, Gothic literature and changes in fashion. Spooner attributes the fact that her approach is so novel to the critical prevalence of a surface-depth model in which the surface of the Gothic is largely ignored because we believe that what it is really about is what lies beneath.Wisely eschewing any attempt systematically to define the Gothic, though demonstrating her familiarity with the work of those who have, Spooner intriguingly proposes that part of the essence of Gothic is its focus on what is vestigial, which she compares to the fondness for corsetry in present-day Goth costume, and this proves the preamble to a sustained discussion of Gothic texts in terms of contemporary fashion.

In the course of this discussion, Spooner ranges widely across an impressive field of texts. The first chapter begins with a discussion ofMarie Antoinette and Burke's sentimental spectator and moves on to discuss a number of Gothic authors, principally Ann Radcliffe and 'Monk' Lewis. This is a provocative and intelligent account, and the approach is particularly fruitful when applied to The Romance of the Forest. The second chapter begins with Jane Eyre's wedding veil and moves on to Carlyle's Sartor Resartus,Dickens, Villette, Lady Audley's Secret, The Woman in White and The Moonstone (with, unsurprisingly, particular attention paid to Franklin Blake's dressing-gown), and Uncle Silas. The next chapter is on freaks, dandies, and female masculinity, including discussion of the Elephant Man and of David Lynch's film of his life, Stoker's Dracula and his The Mystery of the Sea, Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, and Richard Marsh's weird but increasingly studied tale The Beetle, which came out in the same year as Dracula and initially outsold it. The penultimate chapter on 'Cosmo-Gothic' ranges from women's magazines to Rebecca, The Bad Sister and the film Single White Female, while the final combines discussion of modern Goth fashions and the nature of the subculture with comment on the novels of Anne Rice and Poppy Z. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Fashioning Gothic Bodies
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.