Post People

By Anonymous | The Saturday Evening Post, November/December 2006 | Go to article overview

Post People


Anonymous, The Saturday Evening Post


Kids in the Ham Shack at the Fitness Farm sat enraptured as Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger answered their fitness questions at this year's annual Scholarship Games in Indy.

"How many push-ups a day should I do?"

"How soon can I start lifting weights?"

The kids giggled as Arnold quipped back with his usual spontaneous wit and humor.

As a world celebrity. Arnold Schwarzenegger must have taken note that there are two million ham radio operators in Japan, in addition to the millions of hams worldwide with the capability of listening in to his fitness remarks.

Students are invited to the Ham Shack each year where ham aficionados volunteer to encourage kids to adopt this popular hobby. Operators are called "hams" perhaps because in the early days, amateur radio operators worked with their hands to tap out Morse code. Professional radio operators often called amateurs "hamfisted," which was shortened to hams. The term stuck.

He's not retiring. He's stepping up! Early this year, Rev. Robert H. Schuller turned over his pulpit at the Crystal Cathedral to his son, Robert A. Asked on Larry King Live why he was "stepping down," the famous proponent of possibility thinking answered, "I'm stepping up, actually. I started retiring after the first year 50 years ago. I retired from cleaning toilets-haven't cleaned one since. The second year, I retired from opening my own envelopes, and 1 haven't opened them really since.... Every time I retire, I step up to something."

And what might that be? For one thing, spending more quality time with his five children and 17 grandchildren, as well as his musically talented wife, Arvella, the church organist he met while attending Hope College in Holland, Michigan. And, oh, yes, also creating a Crystal Cathedral Foundation to ensure the 40 acres of architectural inspiration and beautiful gardens in Garden Grove, California, will never be sold for a shopping mall.

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