Summer Stories

By Brewer, Jennifer | Pointe, December/January 2006 | Go to article overview

Summer Stories


Brewer, Jennifer, Pointe


Summer intensives away from home can be just what you need for inspiration and improvement.

Summer intensive study has become an integral part of training for most preprofessional dancers, usuaiiv.ifs the chance focus on and improve technique and even make new friends. Though unfamiliar styles of instruction and technique may be frustrating and intimidating at first, and younger students may get homesick, many use the summer to explore dance in new places with different teachers.

To make the experience as positive as possible, dancers should take time during the winter months to audition for several programs, and consider all aspects of each program before making a choice. When the match is just right between dancer and program, going away for summer study can be a marvelous blend of challenge and enjoyment.

That's just what Dani Bahrynian found when she took the summer off from Southern California's Westside School of Ballet last summer to try Pacific Northwest Ballet's intensive program in Seattle.

She expected to be challenged and to learn a lot, but she was surprised that the summer was pleasurable too. "The teachers made every class fun. Everyone there was really into making it the best summer they possibly could," she says. "There is a notion that if you go away it will be really scary and the teachers will be intimidating, but everyone at PNB cares about you as an individual."

Brandon Sears had a similar experience at Milwaukee Ballet last summer. He had left his native Indiana for study at Boston Conservatory and Boston Ballet, but returned to Indiana to determine his next move. Milwaukee's program seemed attractive for its location, professional opportunities and the people. "It's a very nurturing environment, and the teachers and company members were encouraging and helpful. You can grow and make mistakes [there] without feeling too bad about it," he says. At the end of the six-week intensive, Sears was selected to work with MBII, Milwaukee's training company.

Summer programs can be demanding. "It was the hardest I've ever danced," says Chanteal Moss, who trains in the preprofessional program of Atlanta Ballet and studied with Alonzo King's LINES Ballet in San Francisco over the summer. "They push you, and you push yourself. At LINES they teach you to let go of your fears and insecurities, to believe you're a great dancer."

Summer study in Europe proved eye-opening for Lydia Wellington, a student at the School of American Ballet who attended the Bartholin International Ballet Seminar m Copenhagen last summer, studying with teachers from the Bolshoi, Royal Danish Ballet and Paris Opera Ballet "In Europe, a lot of summer programs are not by audition," she says. "They are more relaxed-dancers aren't all planning their summers in January There were dancers on different levels, and the teachers accommodated them. They corrected you according to your level."

A primary benefit of summer training is the improvement most dancers see. While it may be overwhelming at first, getting corrections from different teachers allows many students to make technical leaps. "I overcame so many bad habits."

Bahrynian says. She also saw improvements in both her extension and turns on pointe.

Sears appreciated that his teachers were "all on the same page. They had different teaching styles, but worked toward common goals. They talked with each other and built on each other's work," he says.

It may be difficult to feel adventure-some during the regular school year, but an intensive is a great time to expand your horizons. "The main attraction for me was all the different styles and techniques," says Wellington about Bartholin; like other SAB students, she was encouraged to broaden her training with summer study elsewhere.

LINES's approach was a major departure for Moss, who confesses some trepidation at first but embraced the chance to learn by stepping out of her comfort zone. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Summer Stories
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.